Reports and Books
Selected satellite images of our changing environment
United Nations Environment Programme

This publication uses satellite images to document environmental changes during the last thirty years in 50 selected sites around the world.


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2003

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Reports and Books
Checklist of CITES Species 2003
United Nations Environment Programme

This edition of the Checklist of CITES Species takes into account the amendments of the CITES Appendices and the changes in nomenclature adopted at the 12th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to CITES ( Santiago 2002 ). This book and CD-ROM provide a Checklist of the fauna and the flora listed in Appendices I, II and III of CITES as adopted by the Conference of the Parties, valid from 13 February 2003.


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2003
Reports and Books
2002 report of the flexible and rigid foams: technical options committee
United Nations Environment Programme

Historically, the blowing agent selection made by the foam plastics manufacturing industry was based heavily on CFCs. This was particularly the case in closed cell insulating foams. An assortment of CFCs and other ozone depleting substances (ODSs), including CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CFC-114 and methyl chloroform were used in numerous foam plastic product applications. However, the effect of the phase-out process has been to create further diversification. The first technology transition in the early 1990s led to the introduction of transitional substances such as HCFCs as well as the increasing use of hydrocarbons and other non-ODSs. This transition is still taking place in Article 5(1) countries. In non-Article 5(1) countries, particularly in Europe and North America, attention is now firmly focused on the second phase of technology transition out of the transitional substances. This transition is concentrating attention on the emerging HFC-based technologies, although it should be stressed that much consideration is still being given to the optimisation of hydrocarbon and CO2 technologies1 and these technologies are gaining market share in several sectors. As before, this report details, for each foam type, the technically viable options available to eliminate CFC and other ODS use as of 2002. However, by way of departure from previous reports, this review concentrates primarily on the transition status by product group and region and on issues affecting transition. Coverage of technical options per se is now located for information purposes within the appendices only.


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2003

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Reports and Books
World resources 2002-2004 : decisions for the earth : balance, voice, and power
United Nations Environment Programme

World Resources 2002-2004 examines how we make environmental decisions and who makes them, which is the process of environmental governance. The report argues that better environmental governance is one of the most direct routes to fairer and more sustainable use of natural resources. Decisions made with greater participation and greater knowledge of natural systems-decisions for the Earth-can help to reverse the loss of forest, the decline of soil fertility, and the pollution of air and water that reflect our past failures.


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2003
Reports and Books
Case studies on alternatives to methyl bromide, Volume 2: technologies with low environmental impact in countries with economies in transition
United Nations Environment Programme

UNEP has compiled this document of six case studies to encourage farmers, extension agencies, researchers, policy-makers and other stakeholders from the CEIT region to examine environmentally sustainable techniques, specifically suited to the unique climatic, cultural and socio-economic conditions found in these countries, when considering the replacement of methyl bromide. Included are chemical and non-chemical alternatives, across the spectrum of methyl bromide uses in CEITs, as well as analyses of associated costs and the applicability of technologies to the region. With financing from the Global Environment Facility, as well as additional support from Environment Canada, this document received key input from members of the Methyl Bromide Technical Options Committee (MBTOC), and regional CEIT methyl bromide experts.


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2003