Factsheets
How the Montreal Protocol Protects Health
United Nations Environment Programme

The need to protect human health was the driving force behind the establishment of the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (1987). The treaties are the international
response to the significant threats to human health and the environment posed by the continued use of ozone depleting substances (ODS) in the global economy.


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Factsheets
The Informal Prior-Informed Consent (iPIC) Mechanism - 2016 update
United Nations Environment Programme

As part of its work in providing assistance to developing countries to fulfil their commitments under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, the UNEP DTIE OzonAction Compliance Assistance Programme (CAP) launched the ‘Informal Prior-Informed Consent’ (iPIC) mechanism in 2006. This initiative was developed in order to better manage trade in ozone depleting substances (ODS) that is controlled under the Protocol.


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Factsheets
HCFCs in the Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Sector: How to prepare for the phase down
United Nations Environment Programme

UNEP DTIE OzonAction has come out with two new flyers to provide stakelholders with a general overview and basic information on HCFC phaseout. This flyer addresses HCFCs in the refrigeration and air conditioning sector. The flyers are available in English, French, Spanish, Russian and Chinese.


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Training document
Collecting Baseline Information - Lecture 3
United Nations Environment Programme, Artisanal Gold Council

Estimating Mercury Use and Documenting Practices in Artisanal and Small-scale Gold Mining (ASGM) - Methods and Tools Version 1.0


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Reports and Books
Nature-based Solutions for Water 2018: The United Nations World Water Development Report 2018
UN-Water, United Nations World Water Assessment Programme

More than 2 billion people lack access to safe drinking water and more than double that number lack access to safe sanitation. With a rapidly growing global population, demand for water is expected to increase by nearly one-third by 2050. In the face of accelerated consumption, increasing environmental degradation and the multi-faceted impacts of climate change, we clearly need new ways to manage competing demands on our precious freshwater resources.
The 2018 edition of the UN World Water Development Report (WWDR2018) suggests that solutions may be closer than we think.
For too long, the world has turned first to human-built, or “grey”, infrastructure to improve water management. In so doing, it has often brushed aside traditional and Indigenous knowledge that embraces greener approaches. Three years into the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, it is time for us to re-examine nature-based solutions (NBS) to help achieve water management objectives.
The WWDR2018 illustrates that working with nature, rather than against it, would enhance natural capital and support a resource-efficient and competitive circular economy. NBS can be cost-effective, and simultaneously provide environmental, social and economic benefits. These interwoven benefits, which are the essence of sustainable development, are central to achieving Agenda 2030.


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Manuals, Guides and Toolkits
Toolkit for Identification and Quantification of Mercury Releases: Guideline for Inventory Level 1 Version 1.3 - April 2015
United Nations Environment Programme

The "Toolkit for identification and quantification of mercury releases", the "Toolkit", is intended to assist countries to develop a national mercury releases inventory. 


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Reports and Books
Vetiver Briquette: Feasibility Report
Carbon Roots International, Inc

This study evaluates the technical and commercial feasibility of implementing a vetiver briquette initiative in the South. To do so, the report first defines a successful green charcoal venture in Part I, outlining how it should function and what it should be expected to accomplish. Understanding what the vetiver briquette project should achieve, the report then addresses the major factors that are likely to affect the venture’s success. Part II assesses the Southern region’s infrastructure and key resources, as well as the two local markets most pertinent to a green charcoal venture, the charcoal market, and the vetiver industry. Part III addresses feedstock availability, or the quantity of root and leaf biomass available for charcoal production per annum. The report also assesses the availability of a variety of other agricultural by-products that could be used to augment vetiver, such as corn, sugarcane, and cassava.


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