Reports and Books
UNEP in China: building back better||UNEP 在中国: 重 建 更 好
United Nations Environment Programme

As the United Nations system's designated entity for addressing environmental issues at the global level, the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) was requested by the Government of the People's Republic of China to lend assistance in the aftermath of the disaster. UNEP immediately engaged in the post-disaster recovery effort, including by coordinating the environmental response to the earthquake through its office in Beijing, which was supported by international experts and technical staff from across the organization. This publication outlines the key achievements of UNEP's engagement in the country from 2008 to 2010, which focused primarily on providing high-level expertise and capacity development for the management of the environmental impacts of the disaster.


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2010

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Reports and Books
Sick Water: The Central Role of Wastewater Management in Sustainable Development - A Rapid Response Assessment
United Nations Environment Programme, United Nations Human Settlements Programme

With global action and positive momentum towards improving access to safe water and sanitation, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the UN Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT), and the UN Secretary General's Advisory Board on Water and Sanitation (UNSGAB), in partnership with the members of UN Water have collaborated to bring together their collective experience and expertise to bear on the challenges posed by illegal and unregulated wastewater.


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2010
Reports and Books
Deep-seas Sponge grounds: reservoirs of biodiversity
Hogg, M.M., Tendal, O.S., Conway, K.W., Pomponi, S.A., van Soest, R.W.M., Gutt, J., Krautter, M., Roberts, J.M.

This report draws together scientific understanding of deep-water sponge grounds alongside the threats they face and ways in which they can be conserved. Beginning with a summary of research approaches, sponge biology and biodiversity, the report also gives up-to-date case studies of particular deep-water sponge habitats from around the world. These include the spectacular giant glass sponge reefs of British Columbia – a relic of the time of the dinosaurs – and the diverse sponge kingdom of Antarctica. Long overlooked, recent research now shows that deep-water sponge grounds form complex, slow-growing and long-lived habitats in many parts of the global ocean. As well as forming local biodiversity centres, deep-water sponges are also storehouses of novel chemical compounds, some of which show promise in the fight against cancer and other diseases. Despite their inherent and biotechnological value, deep-water sponge grounds have been damaged by bottom fishing. This report considers the international policy context in which deep-water sponge grounds can be conserved and concludes with a series of expert recommendations for conservation managers and international policy makers. The recommendations set out a series of actions so that these vulnerable marine ecosystems can be conserved for future generations.


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2010
Reports and Books
Blue harvest: inland fisheries as an ecosystem service
United Nations Environment Programme

This report focuses on the importance of inland fisheries as an ecosystem service that significantly contributes to food production and livelihoods in many parts of the world but at the same time depends upon a sustained supply of freshwater of appropriate quality and sustainable ecosystems functioning. The assessment looks at the pressures and the drivers of ecosystems degradation that affect inland fisheries, and reviews opportunities on how to manage inland fisheries sustainably through ecosystem management approaches. Case studies in the report give examples of the status, pressures and how inland fisheries have developed and dealt with in different parts of the world. The publication aims at raising awareness about the importance of inland fisheries as they provide multiple benefits to humans but have been found to be in decline and about the relevance of developing capacities to improve the management of the environment required to protect and sustain this ecosystem service in the long term.


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2010

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