Reports and Books
Global Mercury Waste Assessment: Review of Current National Measures
United Nations Environment Programme

The Minamata Convention on Mercury mandates that mercury waste be managed in an environmentally sound manner, taking into account the guidelines developed under the Basel Convention, and in accordance with requirements to be adopted by the Conference of the Parties. The United Nations Environment Programme, through its International Environmental Technology Centre, conducted this Global Mercury Waste Assessment, which included fact-finding missions to almost 30 countries. The assessment describes the current mercury waste management practices in these countries, and provides a basis for understanding the size and nature of the gap between current practices and the environmentally sound mercury waste management envisioned in the Minamata Convention. The central finding is clear: The gap between the provisions of the Minamata Convention and the current mercury waste management practices is wide.


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Factsheets
Environmental Audit of the Sites Impacted by the "Probo Koala" Toxic Waste Dumping in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire - Site 8: Agboville
United Nations Environment Programme

On 19 August 2006, the ship Probo Koala off-loaded 528 cubic meters of liquid wastes in the port of Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. The material was transferred onto tanker trucks operated by a local contractor, and dumped in twelve different locations around the city. In June 2012, UN Environment received a formal request from the Government of Côte d’Ivoire to undertake an independent and scientific environmental audit of the sites that were impacted by the dumping of wastes of the Probo Koala.
The Government wished for UN Environment to determine whether the sites continued to pose risks for the environment or for public health, and to make recommendations about additional or corrective clean-up measures that would need to be carried out in case contamination was detected.


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Factsheets
Single-Use Plastics: A Roadmap for Sustainability - Fact-sheet for Policymakers
United Nations Environment Programme

The benefits of plastic are undeniable. The material is cheap, lightweight and easy to make. These qualities have led to a boom in the production of plastic over the past century. This trend will continue as global plastic production skyrockets over the next 10 to 15 years. We are already unable to cope with the amount of plastic waste we generate, unless we rethink the way we manufacture, use and manage plastics. Ultimately, tackling one of the biggest environmental scourges of our time will require governments to regulate, businesses to innovate and individuals to act. This paper sets out the latest thinking on how we can achieve this. It looks at what governments, businesses and individuals have achieved at national and sub-national levels to curb the consumption of single-use plastics. It offers lessons that may be useful for policymakers who are considering regulating the production and use of single-use plastics.


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