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Reports and Books
Luxembourg Report on Sustainable Governance Indicators

For more than three decades, Luxembourg’s GDP growth rate as well as rate of job creation was ranked among the top performers in the European Union. Yet both have since decreased considerably and during the review period, a key theme was concerns over the competitiveness of Luxembourg’s economy.


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2014
Reports and Books
Aligning the Financial System with Sustainable Development: An invitation & background briefing
United Nations Environment Programme

Considerable finance is needed to drive the transition to a green, inclusive economy. A “clean trillion” of additional investment is needed annually up to 2030 to enable new infrastructure to be made green. Private capital is needed to finance this transition, complemented by public expenditure, but is currently being channeled into an unsustainable economy. Traded financial capital globally amounts to US$225 trillion, but little of this is being used to power the transition to a green and inclusive economy. Aligning the financial system to enable the long-term health of the real economy may require changes to its architecture, the ‘rules’ governing how it operates. UNEP has established the Inquiry into the Design of a Sustainable Financial System to address this high-potential policy arena. Building on UNEP’s green economy initiative and two decades of work of the UNEP Finance Initiative, the Inquiry is being guided by a high-level Advisory Panel, and involves wide-reaching engagement and research at the national and international levels.


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2014
Reports and Books
The 2012 International Visitors’ Exit Survey Report
National Bureau of Statistics (NBS), United Republic of Tanzania

The primary objective of the survey was to collect up-to-date tourist expenditure information for use in the ‘’Tourist Expenditure Model” developed in 2001. The 2012 survey’s results have indicated that there has been an improved performance of the tourism industry, evidenced by a significant increase in earnings from international visitors. Most of the visitors were impressed by Tanzania as one of the unique quality destinations, with friendly people and wonderful scenery. However, a number of visitors indicated the need for further improvement of the infrastructure particularly, roads between national parks and quality of services in some of the hotels.


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2014
Programme Performance Reports
UNEP Programme Performance Report 2013
United Nations Environment Programme

The 2012-2013 biennium completed the implementation of the first Medium-Term Strategy of UNEP for the period 2010-2013. For the first time in the history of the organization, results-based management principles were fully applied throughout the programme cycle, from planning to monitoring and evaluating our implementation. UNEP’s performance against Expected Accomplishments in the Programme of Work for the biennium 2012-2013 shows: - 64 per cent achieved on schedule||- 85 per cent of indicator targets that were achieved were over-exceeded||- 30 per cent partially achieved with work still underway in some cases. Financial (and human)||resources are not always available at the beginning of the biennium as funds are mobilized during the biennium in which results are to be achieved, sometimes affecting the pace of the organization’s delivery and expenditure rates||- 6 per cent not achieved, owing to indicators that were not possible to measure and were substituted with alternative performance measurements.


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2014
Reports and Books
Assessment of Transboundary Freshwater Vulnerability in Africa to Climate Change
United Nations Environment Programme, Water Research Commission

Managing the freshwater impacts of climate change in Africa is as much a political and development challenge as a technical climate change challenge. Even without climate change, many of Africa’s water resources are facing overuse, pollution, and degradation. Poor land-use practices are contributed to this process. Large numbers of people living in poverty in rural and informal urban areas are already vulnerable to water-related risks, whether floods, droughts, poor water quality, or increasing water scarcity. The status of water resources in Africa has been changing for many decades, whether through decreasing water quality, lowered groundwater, more or less rainfall, and changed timing of rainfall. Change is not new. Climate change, however, will profoundly accelerate the rate of change, affecting the ability of people and societies to respond timeously. The rate of change is compounded by uncertainty of the impacts of climate change. While there are a number of models that attempt to predict the impacts of climate change, many of these are at a very coarse scale and do not predict localised impacts, which may differ from the generalised picture. At the same time, different models predict different climate change trends in the same areas, some, for example, predicting an increase in rainfall, while others predict a decrease in rainfall. Managing for high rates of change in a context of uncertainty is thus what is demanded of African governments.


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2014

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