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Factsheets
QPS uses of Methyl Bromide and their alternatives - OzonAction Factsheet
United Nations Environment Programme

At the 1992 Meeting of the Parties in Copenhagen, methyl bromide (MB) was included as a controlled substance Ozone Depleting Substance, (ODS). Article 2H of the Protocol specifically excluded Quarantine and Pre-shipment (QPS) uses from control measures as it was considered that there were no alternatives to MB for the diverse range of treatments carried out for QPS. Although QPS was about 10% of global MB consumption at the time, this use was nevertheless considered especially significant in allowing inter- and intra-country trade in commodities treated with MB in the absence of site-specific alternatives. Since that time Parties have nevertheless been urged to adopt alternatives to MB for QPS and reduce emissions and use of this fumigant whenever possible.


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Manuals and Guides
A training Manual on Integrated Environmental Assessment and Reporting: Training Module 8: Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning – for Improvement and Increased Impact of the IEA Process
United Nations Environment Programme

Module 8 promotes an improvement-oriented evaluation that aims to increase the effectiveness of national or sub-national IEA process by feeding lessons learned into the next cycle. Learning plays a central role. It shapes the monitoring and evaluation process, and keeps knowledge creation connected with policy making.


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Other
The Secretary General's Message on the International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer, 16 September 2016
United Nations

Country activities on the occasion of the International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer 2016


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Reports and Books
Central Asia Waste Management Outlook
United Nations Environment Programme, The International Solid Waste Association, Technology for Environment

Central Asia is transforming itself from a region bogged down by mining and industrial waste legacies and poor municipal waste management to a safer and more pleasant place to live through site clean-ups and increasingly effective waste management systems. A lot still remains to be done, but the outlook for the region is much less gloomy than just a few years ago. The Waste Management Outlook for Central Asia provides a richly illustrated synthesis of the regional waste challenges, along with facts and figures from the countries. Communication maps, diagrams, illustrations and case studies from all over the region complement the well-researched text. The outlook guides the reader from global principles to local management solutions. Policymakers in the region, practitioners worldwide and non-specialists and the general public alike will appreciate the easily understandable text and illustrations.


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