Reports and Books
Status of the Environment in the Republic of Palau
Palau Conservation Society

Palau is blessed with a wealth of natural resources. We enjoy clean air, clean water, abundant marine life, and healthy, productive reefs. Our stunning Rock Islands and majestic dive sites continue to draw admiration from around the world. But Palau’s wealth is not just found in its natural resources. Palau has also been blessed with a wealth of human resources and technical capabilities. The population of Palau is well educated and highly talented, and makes use of the most advanced computer and development techniques on a daily basis. Weaving these sources of natural and human wealth together is perhaps the most important resource of all: our traditions. Palauans maintain strong cultural ties to their land, their waters, and their history, and with these ties we strive to preserve and conserve all of our precious resources. This is not to say that Palau does not have its problems and pressures. Development pressure is strong and driven largely by economic motives. Balancing the benefits of development with the dangers of exploitation continues to be a challenge, but a challenge that Palauans are meeting head on.


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2004
Annual Reports
Asian Development Outlook 2004: Foreign Direct Investment in Developing Asia
Asian Development Bank

The annual Asian Development Outlook provides a comprehensive economic analysis of 41 economies in developing Asia and the Pacific. On the basis of the Asian Development Bank's unique knowledge of the region, this 16th edition overviews aggregate trends and medium-term prospects by subregion–East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, Central Asia, and the Pacific–in the context of global economic movements. The region's developing economies generally showed remarkable resilience in 2003. Despite the uncertainties generated by the Iraq conflict, high oil prices, the outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic, and a slow recovery in major industrial countries during the first half of the year, economic growth reached 6.3% in 2003, making it the most dynamic region in the world. Intraregional trade and strong consumer demand will define the outlook for developing Asia in 2004-2005. The stronger outlook for industrial countries over that period will provide a cushion against a possible slowing of surging exports to the People's Republic of China. It will also soften the impact of fiscal consolidation measures that need to be taken in some regional economies. The Asian Development Outlook 2004 includes a chapter on foreign direct investment (FDI) in developing Asia. It argues that, based on a study of a diverse group of developing Asian countries with large or rapidly rising inflows of FDI, the international benefits of FDI are, in fact, highly variable but not necessarily cost-free. The magnitude and productivity of capital flows are dependent on the establishment of an enabling, business-friendly commercial environment, consistent with national development objectives. In this context, a useful paradigm is the \"three i's\"–incentives, institutions, and infrastructure.


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2004
Annual Reports
Asian Development Outlook 2004 Update
Asian Development Bank

Developing Asia and the Pacific will grow at 7.0% in 2004, outperforming ADO 2004 forecast of 6.8%. Rebounding exports and buoyant intraregional trade boosted growth, says the ADO 2004 Update. For 2005, as external demand levels off and high oil prices filter through domestic demand, growth forecast is scaled back to 6.2%, from the 6.7% forecast in April. This issue of the Update also assesses different scenarios relating to the short-term impacts of a PRC slowdown and sustained high oil prices on the region.


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2004
Reports and Books
Report of the technology and economic assessment panel: critical use nominations for methyl bromide
United Nations Environment Programme

Critical use nominations for Methyl Bromide. To apply the following criteria and procedure in assessing a critical methyl bromide use for the purpose of control measures.


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2004
GEO
Global Environment Outlook Scenario Framework: Background Paper for UNEPs Third Global Environment Outlook Report (GEO-3)
United Nations Environment Programme

UNEP's Global Environment Outlook (GEO) series provides a comprehensive assessment of the state of the global environment, a review of policy responses and an outlook on the future. This report introduces the scenario approach, a means of illuminating challenges and appropriate responses toward the achievement of certain development pathways based upon current conditions and driving forces.


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2004
Serials
Tessa and the Fishy Mystery
United Nations Environment Programme

'Tessa and the Fishy Mystery' is part of the Tunza Environmental Series for Children, sponsored by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). \"Tunza\" means \" to treat with care of affection\" in Kiswahili. UNEP hopes to inspire caring for the Earth through creative literature that sparks the interest and awareness of children, their parents and teachers. See also 'Theo and the Giant Plastic Ball' , 'Tina and the Green City', 'Tore and the Town on Thin Ice' and 'Trishna and the Dream of Water'.


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2004
Reports and Books
Review of the status and conservation actions for CMS concerted action species
United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre (United Nations Environment Programme-WCMC)

The present report provides rapid reviews of the conservation status and conservation actions undertaken for the 43 CMS Concerted Action Species (Res. Conf 7.1). Information has been chiefly compiled from sources integrated through the CMS Information Management System (CMS IMS). These include internet sites and databases of specialised agencies, as well as data available from the CMS Party Reports Database, and at UNEP-WCMC.


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2004
Reports and Books
United Nations List of Protected Areas (2003)
United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre

The 2003 United Nations List of Protected Areas presents data on 102,102 protected areas covering 18.8 million km2. Within this total figure, there are 69,066 protected areas with lUCN Management Categories. In addition, there are 4,633 internationally designated sites. Although there has been an increase in the range of data presented in the 2003 UN List, compared to previous editions, it is clear that there has been a substantial increase in the extent of the world's terrestrial conservation estate in the past seven years. However, marine areas still make up a very small component - 1.7 million km' or 9.1% of the total area protected. This is the thirteenth edition in a series that was initiated by the United Nations more than 40 years ago. The last edition published data collected in 1997. Of the previous 12 UN Lists published, five ( 1982-1 997) have been prepared jointly by UNEP-WCMC and lUCN. As well as changes in the format and content of the 2003 UN List, the process involved to gather and review the data reflected the widening of partnership arrangements instituted in 2002 to manage the World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA) that underpins the UN List. This partnership includes other organisations through the WDPA Consortium, as well as agreements with intergovernmental organisations, such as the European Environment Agency and the ASEAN Regional Centre for Biodiversity Conservation. This is also the first UN List prepared since the World Conservation Monitoring Centre became part of UNEP.


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2004
Reports and Books
Waste stabilization ponds and constructed wetlands: design manual
Kayombo, S., Mbwette, T.S.A., Katima, J.H.Y, Ladegaard, N., Jrgensen, S.E.

This Manual provides information for designers, builders and operators about a wide range of applications and objectives such as developing, implementing and operating Artificially Constructed Wetlands (ACW) and Waste Stabilization Ponds (WSP)||Standard systems approach which can be adopted universally and which can accommodate a development technology with changes in information concepts and ideas with time||theoretical background on the biological, chemical and physical processes of each method, the current state of the technology and technical knowledge on how to design, operate and maintain them||and theoretical knowledge on how best the models may be used to describe the systems.


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2004
Reports and Books
Incorporating resource impacts into fisheries subsidies disciplines: issues and options
United Nations Environment Programme

This discussion paper considers the potential implications of the conclusions drawn in the Matrix Paper for an international reform of subsidies. With the aim of stimulating dialogue, it offers one view of several possible options for incorporating the impact on resources into existing and new WTO disciplines on fisheries subsidies.


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2004