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Booklets and Brochures
Welcome to the SAICM Chemicals in Products Programme!
United Nations Environment Programme
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Other
UNEP’s Project Concern Feedback Form
United Nations Environment Programme

UNEP is committed to avoiding or minimizing unintended harm that may be caused by UNEP’s work directly or indirectly to stakeholders. When you have a concern over a UNEP project or activity, we strongly advise you to make an effort to raise it to the relevant UNEP Project Manager, UNEP’s local project partners or consultants or the related UNEP Regional Office prior to contacting the Independent Office for Stakeholder Safeguard-related Response (IOSSR) through this form.


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Summaries
Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis; Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change - Summary for Policymakers
United Nations Environment Programme, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

The Working Group I contribution to the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report describes progress in understanding of
the human and natural drivers of climate change, observed climate change, climate processes and attribution, and estimates of projected future climate change. It builds upon past IPCC assessments and incorporates new findings from the past six years of research. Scientific progress since the Third Assessment Report (TAR) is based upon large amounts of new and more comprehensive data, more sophisticated analyses of data, improvements in understanding of processes and their simulation in models and more extensive exploration of uncertainty ranges. The basis for substantive paragraphs in this Summary for Policymakers can be found in the chapter sections specified in curly brackets.


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Summaries
A Case of Benign Neglect: Knowledge Gaps About Sustainability in Pastoralism and Rangelands - Executive Summary
United Nations Environment Programme, GRID-Arendal

Pastoralism is practiced by millions of people worldwide. It has roots in every part of the world and back thousands of years to the beginning of agriculture. But while pastoral societies have existed for millennia, we still don’t know that much about the interlinkages between pastoral practices and the rangelands these depend upon. It’s as if they are invisible in a lot of research about the global environment. There are many questions we cannot answer today with confidence because of widespread gaps in understanding rangelands and pastoralists. Yet, the answers to these questions have profound implications for national and global policy – and influence on how we will deal with climate change. This report directly responds to one of the resolutions approved at the United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA) in May 2016, which acknowledges the dearth of information on pastoralism and rangelands. The resolution calls for a gap analysis of environmental and socioeconomic information and the provision of technical support for promoting pastoralism and rangelands. This report is also guided by the mandate of UN Environment to conduct integrated assessments and analyses, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and specifically the SDGs and their targets and indicators related to pastoralism and rangelands.


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