Summaries
State of the Science of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals 2012: Summary for Decision-Makers
United Nations Environment Programme

This Summary for Decision-Makers, together with the main document, State of the Science of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals—2012 presents information and key concerns for policy-makers on endocrine disruptors as part of the ongoing collaboration between the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to address concerns about the potential adverse health effects of chemicals on humans and wildlife.


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2012

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Summaries
Decoupling natural resource use and environmental impacts from economic growth [Summary]
United Nations Environment Programme

By 2050, humanity could devour an estimated 140 billion tons of minerals, ores, fossil fuels and biomass per year – three times its current appetite – unless the economic growth rate is “decoupled” from the rate of natural resource consumption. Developed countries citizens consume an average of 16 tons of those four key resources per capita (ranging up to 40 or more tons per person in some developed countries). By comparison, the average person in India today consumes four tons per year. With the growth of both population and prosperity, especially in developing countries, the prospect of much higher resource consumption levels is “far beyond what is likely sustainable” if realized at all given finite world resources, warns this report by UNEP’s International Resource Panel. Already the world is running out of cheap and high quality sources of some essential materials such as oil, copper and gold, the supplies of which, in turn, require ever-rising volumes of fossil fuels and freshwater to produce. Improving the rate of resource productivity (“doing more with less”) faster than the economic growth rate is the notion behind “decoupling,” the panel says. That goal, however, demands an urgent rethink of the links between resource use and economic prosperity, buttressed by a massive investment in technological, financial and social innovation, to at least freeze per capita consumption in wealthy countries and help developing nations follow a more sustainable path.


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2011
Factsheets, Summaries
Action plan for the Caribbean of Marine Mammals (MMAP) in the Wider Caribbean Region
United Nations Environment Programme, Caribbean Environment Programme

The Specially Protected Areas and Wildlife (SPAW) Protocol, born out of the Convention for the Protection and Development of the Marine Environment of the Wider Caribbean Region (Cartagena Convention), came into force in 2000 and is the only regional biodiversity legal agreement for the advancement of the conservation and protection of the marine environment in the Wider
Caribbean Region (WCR). All the species of the WCR listed in Annex II of the SPAW Protocol are considered to be threatened or endangered species and their capture, take or possession is prohibited, unless for traditional use to satisfy cultural and subsistence
needs. The SPAW Protocol calls for the development and implementation of conservation, recovery or management programmes, as well as guidelines and criteria for the management of protected species.


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2010

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Summaries
Towards sustainable production and use of resources: assessing biofuels - Summary
United Nations Environment Programme

This report was produced by the Working Group on biofuels of the International Panel for Sustainable Resource Management. It provides an overview of the key problems and perspectives toward sustainable production and use of biofuels. It is based on an extensive literature study, taking into account recent major reviews. The focus is on so-called first generation biofuels while considering further lines of development. In the overall context of enhancing resource productivity, options for more efficient and sustainable production and use of biomass are examined.


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2009

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