Reports and Books
Environmental Indicators in Northeast Asia
United Nations Environment Programme

Agenda 21 emphasized the need for developing indicators to provide the solid base for decision making at local, national, regional and global levels. The Johannesburg Plan of Implementation in 2002 reiterated the need for indicators to monitor economic, social and environmental progress for sustainable development. Goal 7 of the UN Millennium Development Goals is set for countries to ensure environmental sustainability through integrating principles of sustainable development into country policies and programmes, and reverse the loss of environmental resources. This report on Environmental Indicators for Northeast Asia has been prepared to present the trends of twenty nine key indicators on air, water, land and biodiversity. It also presents trends on social and economic conditions through the selected indicators. Data have been collected for each indicator for each country in Northeast Asia for 1990, 1995 and 2000. This report provides an assessment of economic, social and environmental conditions in Northeast Asia based on available data and information. Lack of updated scientific database has been a major challenge in preparation of the report. This report highlights that poverty in Northeast Asia is forecast to drop significantly by 2015. China's economic growth and prosperity has led to a reduction in the poverty numbers in the sub-region. The Human Development Index (HDI) increased consistently for all the countries of the sub-region except Mongolia where it slightly decreased during 1990 to 1995. Desertification is an important environmental issue in this sub-region. Mongolia and China are being deeply affected by land degradation and top soil loss. Sustainable agriculture practices along with awareness about land management will help impede desertification. Air quality has worsened in the leading cities of this sub-region. Legal measures and effective policies are needed to counter the rising air pollution. UNEP hopes that the Environmental Indicators for Northeast Asia will be a useful document for government, nongovernment, regional and international organizations in the pursuit of developing policies and action plan. UNEP gratefully acknowledge the contribution of Environment Ministries, agencies, institutes and individuals in the preparation of the report.


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2004
Reports and Books
Africa Environment Information Network (AEIN): Strengthening Environmental Assessment and Report
United Nations Environment Programme

The implementation of the Africa Environment Information Network (AEIN) initiative to support the Africa Environment Outlook (AEO) reporting process is now underway with 13 countries fully involved in the pilot phase and the whole region participating in capacity building activities. The goal of AEIN is to enhance accessibility to more reliable environmental data and information at national level for the environmental assessment and reporting in the region.


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2004

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Reports and Books
Lessons Learned on Mainstreaming Pilot Projects into Larger Projects
Helias Udo de Haes and Martijn van Rooijen (Leiden University), Guido Sonnemann (United Nations Environment Programme DTIE), Konrad Saur (Five Winds International), Greg Norris (Harvard School of Public Health), Olivier Jolliet (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne)

This report summarizes lessons learned from implementing Environmentally Sound Technology (EST) pilot projects by the International Environmental Technology Centre of UNEP Division of Technology, Industry and Economics (UNEP-DTIE-IETC). The document aims to inform national level mainstreaming of the EST pilot project results, and provides lessons learned for decision-makers in national governments and for international technical cooperation personnel. The featured projects were conducted within three pillars of IETC's focal areas. They are: Support for Environmental Management of the Iraqi Marshlands project in the water-sanitation pillar||Integrated Solid Waste Management project in China, India and Lesotho under the waste management pillar||and ESTs for Building waste Reduction in Indonesia (DEBRI) project under the disaster management pillar. Each project and cross-cutting lessons learned focus on six areas, which are project management structure, governance, capacity building, EST implementation, financing, and local conditions/infrastructure.


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2004
Reports and Books
United Nations List of Protected Areas (2003)
United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre

The 2003 United Nations List of Protected Areas presents data on 102,102 protected areas covering 18.8 million km2. Within this total figure, there are 69,066 protected areas with lUCN Management Categories. In addition, there are 4,633 internationally designated sites. Although there has been an increase in the range of data presented in the 2003 UN List, compared to previous editions, it is clear that there has been a substantial increase in the extent of the world's terrestrial conservation estate in the past seven years. However, marine areas still make up a very small component - 1.7 million km' or 9.1% of the total area protected. This is the thirteenth edition in a series that was initiated by the United Nations more than 40 years ago. The last edition published data collected in 1997. Of the previous 12 UN Lists published, five ( 1982-1 997) have been prepared jointly by UNEP-WCMC and lUCN. As well as changes in the format and content of the 2003 UN List, the process involved to gather and review the data reflected the widening of partnership arrangements instituted in 2002 to manage the World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA) that underpins the UN List. This partnership includes other organisations through the WDPA Consortium, as well as agreements with intergovernmental organisations, such as the European Environment Agency and the ASEAN Regional Centre for Biodiversity Conservation. This is also the first UN List prepared since the World Conservation Monitoring Centre became part of UNEP.


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2004

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Reports and Books
Resource kit on sustainable consumption & production
United Nations Environment Programme

This resource kit on sustainable consumption and production is composed of fact sheets on 12 different topics: advertising, Ecodesign, energies, food, housing, leisure, lifestyles, mobility, NICT , textiles, tourism, water. The fact sheets aim at providing background information on a selection of themes by analysing the environmental and/or social impacts of related activities and featuring examples of good practices around the world.


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2004