Booklets and Brochures
Ozzy Ozone Defender of Our Planet: Ozzy Flies High!
United Nations Environment Programme

This richly-illustrated comic booklet uses the Ozzy Ozone character and his new friends to educate children about the causes and effects of ozone layer depletion, the need to follow “safe sun” practices, and actions that they can take to be “ozone-friendly”. Developed as part of UNEP’s work programme under the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol, this booklet is part of a suite of educational materials linked to the Ozzy Ozone video. This booklet is suitable for dissemination in schools as part of a national ozone protection awareness campaigns. The Ozzy Ozone character is a registered trademark of the Government of Barbados. UNEP would like to thank the Government of Barbados for its permission to use this character.


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Booklets and Brochures
Cold Chain Technology Brief - Transport Refrigeration
United Nations Environment Programme, International Institute of Refrigeration

This brief provides an overview of the main areas of transport refrigeration, some of the different
systems used and the working fluids employed. It will go on to look at current trends in using alternative refrigerants and the direction the sector is moving in over a longer period. Future developments will be discussed along with the technical challenges facing designers as they attempt to reach the best balance between what the end user expects from a system and the framework determined by international treaties and regulations.


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Booklets and Brochures, Manuals, Guides and Toolkits
Protecting Seagrass through Payments for Ecosystem Services: A Community Guide
United Nations Environment Programme

This document explores the ways in which community groups could use Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) to run a seagrass conservation project. It outlines the requirements of running a project and include best practice guidance on governing and operating a
community-based conservation project. It provides guidance and best-practice advice on how to do so and acts as a ‘signposting’ guide to resources elsewhere. The scope of the document is intended to be global and so details of country specific legislation, cultural context or other factors that will be key considerations in running a community-based seagrass conservation project cannot be covered. It is intended for use by community groups and project developers with an interest in establishing a community-based seagrass conservation project. It provides general guidance for doing so as well as supplementary information on setting up a Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) project.


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Booklets and Brochures
Cold Chain Technology Brief - Cold Storage and Refrigerated Warehouse
United Nations Environment Programme, International Institute of Refrigeration

Cold storage warehouses store food after production and before foods are transported and distributed to supermarkets or catering establishments. Food is stored either chilled or frozen and may remain in the store for periods of a few hours, days or even a year (for some fruits and vegetables) in chillers and up to several months in freezers. This sector has been shown to be one of the sectors of the cold chain where the temperature of products is well temperature-controlled. Energy usage is important to cold store operators as it is a high proportion of the overall operating costs. Cold storage warehouses traditionally have high usage of low global warming potential refrigerants.


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Booklets and Brochures
Cold Chain Technology Brief - Commercial, Professional and Domestic Refrigeration
United Nations Environment Programme, International Institute of Refrigeration

Due to the complex nature of the cold chain and the high temperature dependency of post-harvest
or post-mortem deterioration in food, temperature control in the food chain is vital. Temperature control tends to become less well controlled at the retail/professional and domestic stages of the cold chain. The food chain is responsible for greenhouse gas emissions through direct (refrigerant emissions) and indirect (energy consumption) eff ects. Published data for overall emissions for each section of a whole cold chain are relatively scarce. However, there is evidence to suggest that the retail sector has relatively high direct and indirect emissions compared to other sectors of the food cold chain.


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