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Reports and Books
World resources 2002-2004 : decisions for the earth : balance, voice, and power
United Nations Environment Programme

World Resources 2002-2004 examines how we make environmental decisions and who makes them, which is the process of environmental governance. The report argues that better environmental governance is one of the most direct routes to fairer and more sustainable use of natural resources. Decisions made with greater participation and greater knowledge of natural systems-decisions for the Earth-can help to reverse the loss of forest, the decline of soil fertility, and the pollution of air and water that reflect our past failures.


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2003
Reports and Books
Case studies on alternatives to methyl bromide, Volume 2: technologies with low environmental impact in countries with economies in transition
United Nations Environment Programme

UNEP has compiled this document of six case studies to encourage farmers, extension agencies, researchers, policy-makers and other stakeholders from the CEIT region to examine environmentally sustainable techniques, specifically suited to the unique climatic, cultural and socio-economic conditions found in these countries, when considering the replacement of methyl bromide. Included are chemical and non-chemical alternatives, across the spectrum of methyl bromide uses in CEITs, as well as analyses of associated costs and the applicability of technologies to the region. With financing from the Global Environment Facility, as well as additional support from Environment Canada, this document received key input from members of the Methyl Bromide Technical Options Committee (MBTOC), and regional CEIT methyl bromide experts.


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2003

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Reports and Books
From ocean to aquarium: the global trade in marine ornamental species
Colette W., Michelle, T., Edmund G., Tries, R.

UNEP-WCMC Biodiversity Series No. 17. With the total value of the marine ornamental trade amounting to as much as US$330 million a year and an estimated 2 million people worldwide keeping marine aquaria, the industry plays a significant role in both source and destination countries. Tropical coral reefs are the most important source of specimens for the aquarium trade - mainly fish, including seahorses, the corals themselves, and others such as anemones, starfish and giant clams. Almost all marine aquarium species are taken from the wild, with few examples of captive breeding. From Ocean to Aquarium presents a brief overview of how the trade functions and the impacts it has on coral reefs, as well as on the human communities that derive an income from trading in marine ornamental species. From Ocean to Aquarium is the product of a collaboration between UNEP-WCMC, the Marine Aquarium Council (MAC) and the industry itself. It is the first of its kind, examining issues surrounding the trade of live coral, fish and invertebrates for the marine aquarium trade, and presenting a comprehensive and independent synthesis of related information.


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2003

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