Tagged on: Reports and Books

Reports and Books
The First Global Integrated Marine Assessment: World Ocean Assessment I
United Nations

The first World Ocean Assessment provides an important scientific basis for the consideration of ocean issues by Governments, intergovernmental processes, and all policy-makers and others involved in ocean affairs. The Assessment reinforces the science-policy interface and establishes the basis for future assessments. Together with future assessments and related initiatives, it will help in the implementation of the recently adopted 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, particularly its ocean-related goals.


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2016
Reports and Books
Global Nutrition Report 2016: From Promise to Impact: Ending Malnutrition by 2030
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

The 2016 Global Nutrition Report is an authoritative source of action-oriented nutrition knowledge that transcends politics and guides the SUN Movement in its quest to make nutrition a priority. This report continues to push the boundaries beyond previous editions—with an optimistic message that when we work together, our collective impact can achieve the changes needed to sustainably transform lives, communities, and the future. Eradicating malnutrition requires perseverance from all of us, and the report gives us our backbone and resolve. It also ensures that we hold each other accountable and learn from each other’s successes and failures. The Global Nutrition Report emphasizes the challenges posed by the multiple forms of malnutrition. It also signals the enormous importance of investing in the critical 1,000-day window so that every girl and boy can lead a happy, healthy, and productive life. Investing in nutrition is our collective legacy for a sustainable world in 2030. Few challenges facing the global community today match the scale of malnutrition, a condition that directly affects one in three people. Malnutrition manifests itself in many different ways: as poor child growth and development||as individuals who are skin and bone or prone to infection||as those who are carrying too much weight or whose blood contains too much sugar, salt, fat, or cholesterol||or those who are deficient in important vitamins or minerals. Malnutrition and diet are by far the biggest risk factors for the global burden of disease: every country is facing a serious public health challenge from malnutrition. The economic consequences represent losses of 11 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) every year in Africa and Asia, whereas preventing malnutrion delivers $16 in returns on investment for every $1 spent. The world’s countries have agreed on targets for nutrition, but despite some progress in recent years the world is off track to reach those targets. This third stocktaking of the state of the world’s nutrition points to ways to reverse this trend and end all forms of malnutrition by 2030. Over the past decade, momentum around nutrition has been steadily building: In 2012 the World Health Assembly adopted the 2025 Global Targets for Maternal, Infant and Young Child Nutrition. The following year, it went on to adopt targets for noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), including those relevent to nutrition. Also in 2013, at the first Nutrition for Growth (N4G) Summit, donors committed US$23 billion to actions to improve nutrition. With the Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2) in 2014 and with the recent naming of 2016–2025 as the United Nations Decade of Action on Nutrition, more and more people have begun to recognize the importance of addressing malnutrition in all its forms. In 2015, the UN Sustainable Development Goals enshrined the objective of “ending all forms of malnutrition,” challenging the world to think and act differently on malnutrition—to focus on all its faces and work to end it, for all people, by 2030. Now, 2016 brings major opportunities to translate this commitment into action. These opportunities include countries’ adoption of their own targets related to the Sustainable Development Goals, the ongoing Nutrition for Growth process, and Japan’s growing leadership on nutrition in the lead-up to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics. The Global Nutrition Report is the only independent and comprehensive annual review of the state of the world’s nutrition. It is a multipartner initiative that holds a mirror up to our successes and failures at meeting intergovernmental nutrition targets.1 It documents progress on commitments made on the global stage, and it recommends actions to accelerate that progress. The Global Nutrition Report aims to be a beacon, providing examples of change and identifying opportunities for action. This year’s report focuses on the theme of making—and measuring— SMART commitments to nutrition and identifying what it will take to end malnutrition in all its forms by 2030.


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2016
Reports and Books
The United Kingdom: Global Hub, Local Dynamics - Mapping the transition to a sustainable financial system
United Nations Environment Programme

The UK’s transition towards a sustainable financial system is shaped by a dynamic between domestic green economy priorities and its role as a global financial centre. With financial assets worth eight times annual GDP, the UK financial system is disproportionately large when compared to the underlying domestic economy. The City of London is not only home to some of the world’s largest financial markets, but also to a range of sustainable finance initiatives that are setting the agenda both domestically and internationally. Historically, it was the key location in the initial rise of carbon markets and a leader in the integration of environmental, social and governance factors into institutional investment. It is now a pioneer in confronting climate risk. The UK has also become a global centre for Islamic Finance, a striking example of how the public and private sectors have cooperated to develop a strategic competence in a growing area of values-based finance. The crisis that followed the 2008 credit crunch had enormous costs for the UK economy, and profoundly impacted the structure and governance of UK financial markets. The continued prevalence of market abuse and high-profile scandals in the aftermath of the crisis has inspired a renewed vigour by regulators and legislators, with recent efforts to restore trust and public confidence focusing on market integrity and professional conduct. Importantly, the focus on stability risk has also changed the ways in which sustainability is being considered by firms and regulators – notably by shifting attention from the institutional to the systemic level. Over the past 15 years, four “waves” of sustainable finance innovation have taken place in the UK, starting with ethical investment, moving to mainstreaming environmental factors into institutional investment, the surge of post-crisis reform and the current focus on climate and carbon risk. Across these, a UK model of innovation emerges – one starting with social entrepreneurs and civil society organizations raising expectations for financial institutions, practitioners competing to capitalize on new market expectations and finally regulation being introduced to universalize good practice. Currently, there are six priority areas for sustainable finance in the UK: 1. Social innovation: aligning finance with individual values and social purpose – for example, from leading work on ‘unburnable’ carbon and stranded assets to new thinking about the overall purpose of the financial system. 2. Institutional stewardship: placing sustainability factors at the heart of mainstream financial sectors, most notably investment management – for example, the Law Commission’s review of fiduciary duty. 3. Capital market mobilization: incorporating sustainability into equity and debt market disclosure, analysis and capital raising – for example, mandatory reporting of greenhouse gases on the London Stock Exchange. Green bonds are also critical growth area: the UK was the third largest green bond market in 2015. 4. Housing finance: improving the environmental and energy performance of the UK’s housing stock through new ways to mobilize financing – for example, finding a practical successor to the Green Deal mechanism. 5. Prudential governance: embedding sustainability into the safety and soundness of key sectors and the system as a whole – for example, the Bank of England’s review of insurance and climate change. 6. Public balance sheet: mobilizing fiscal and other resources to facilitate the transition to a low-carbon, green economy – for example, the launch of the world’s first Green Investment Bank. The UK’s leadership in many areas is clear. But sustainability could perhaps be classified as a ‘sleeping giant’ of the financial system. Initial innovation is sometimes developed in the UK, but then deepened by fast followers in other markets. Many of the promising initiatives are also relatively new and will need careful nurturing to flourish. Heading into 2016, the global momentum is likely to intensify, not least through China’s decision to make green finance a core theme of its G20 Presidency, launching a new study group co-chaired by China and the UK, for which UNEP will act as secretariat. Domestically, the dialogues that contributed to this country report revealed significant enthusiasm for the development of a clear roadmap for sustainable finance in the UK. This would seek to build on existing innovations, overcome key bottlenecks and identify shared priorities for future action. A number of countries are introducing national roadmaps – notably China and Indonesia – and based on the findings of this report, a UK Sustainable Finance Strategy could take forward the following priorities: - Deepen sustainability disclosure and analytics: Disclosure on UK capital markets is improving, but could be deepened on climate, food and water. - Confirm the sustainability dimensions of stewardship, fiduciary duty and investment structure: Improving sustainability performance in the investment chain is not just a question of rules, but also developing pension funds with the scale and capacity to deliver. - Establish a Green Bond Hub: A UK Green Bond Market Development Committee would help to consolidate existing market innovation and provide a platform for future growth. - Empower individual investors with the right information: Innovative use of communications technology could bring information on the sustainability of investment funds to the consumer, strengthening financial literacy. - Build on the track record of the Green Investment Bank: The Green Investment Bank has considerable potential to facilitate capital deployment as it moves into its next phase, addressing market failures that remain pressing issues. - Enhance financing for the greening of the UK’s homes: Breakthrough ideas are needed to develop ways of financing home retrofits that are attractive and compelling for the consumer. - Take a system-wide view on environmental risk: The Bank of England’s prudential review of insurance is world-leading, and the lessons could be applied to other sectors and parts of the system, such as banking and pension funds. - Explore the green potential of alternative finance: The UK is Europe’s leader in alternative finance – such as peer-to-peer – and this could be leveraged for the green economy. - Embed sustainability into financial culture: Following the crisis, considerable attention has been placed on improving financial culture. The sustainability dimension could now be incorporated as an additional motivational driver for improved conduct over the long-term.


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2016
Reports and Books
OECD-FAO Agricultural outlook 2016-2025
OECD/Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

The twelfth joint edition of the OECD-FAO Agricultural Outlook provides market projections to 2025 for major agricultural commodities, biofuels and fish. The 2016 report contains a special feature on the prospects for, and challenges facing, Sub-Saharan Africa. Over the ten year Outlook period slowing demand growth will be matched by efficiency gains in production, implying relatively flat real agricultural prices. However, market and policy uncertainties imply a risk of resurgent volatility. The outlook for agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa is for rising food availability, which will support a declining incidence of undernourishment. The sector’s prospects could be much improved by more stable policies across the region, by strategic public and private investments, notably in infrastructure, and by suitably adapted research and extension.


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2016
Reports and Books, Summaries
Transboundary Waters Assessment Programme (TWAP) Vol. 3: River Basins - Transboundary River Basins: Status and Trends - Summary for Policy Makers
United Nations Environment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-DHI

This report presents the results of the first global assessment of transboundary river basins, prepared in partnership with UNEP-DHI (lead), the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, the Stockholm International Water Institute, Oregon State University, The City University of New York Environmental CrossRoads Initiative, the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, Columbia University Center for International Earth Science Information Network, the Delta Alliance, and the University of Kassel Center for Environmental Systems Research.


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2016
Reports and Books
Marine litter legislation: A toolkit for policymakers
United Nations Environment Programme; Environmental Law Institute

Far too much of the 300 million tonnes of plastic produced every year finds its way into our oceans, food chains and ecosystems, damaging our health in the process. Well-designed laws can help reverse this global trend. This report provides an overview of legislation that countries have implemented to tackle marine litter, focusing in particular on upstream solutions.


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2016
Reports and Books, Manuals and Guides
YouthXchange green skills and lifestyles guidebook
United Nations Environment Programme and United Nations Educational, Scientifi c and Cultural Organization (United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization)

This publication was developed as a primer for youth on the green economy, particularly since there are no youth-friendly publication that explain this issue to youth. This publication enables youth to better familiarize themselves with the green economy and the skills needed for it (e.g. engaging in social innovation and green entrepreneurship).


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2016
Reports and Books
Global Assessment of Sand and Dust Storms
United Nations Environment Programme

The specific objectives of the assessment are to: 1) Synthesise and highlight the environmental and socio-economic causes and impacts of SDS, as well as available technical measures for their mitigation, at the local, regional and global levels||2) Show how the mitigation of SDS can yield multiple sustainable development benefits||3) Synthesize information on current policy responses for mitigating SDS and 4) Present options for an improved strategy for mitigating SDS at the local, regional and global levels, building on existing institutions and agreements.


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2016
Reports and Books
Environment, religion and culture in the context of the 2030 agenda for sustainable development
United Nations Environment Programme

Critical action is needed by the international community to address urgent and increasing environmental degradation, and related challenges of social and economic unsustainability. Religion and culture can significantly address climate change, biodiversity and ecosystem loss, pollution, deforestation, desertification and unsustainable land and water use, and other urgent issues identified in a shared vision by all nations in line with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Through integrating environmental dimension of the 2030 Agenda, religious and cultural communities can also promote strong, inclusive, green, sustainable and transformative economies, based on circularity, sharing and collaboration, and alternative measures of growth and wellbeing. They can be instrumental in educating for more sustainable lifestyles and behaviours to achieve sustainable consumption and production, and in considering the impact of their actions on others. They can significantly contribute to ending extreme poverty, leaving no one behind when addressing multi-dimensional poverty and related challenges such as the rights of women, youth and minorities, and access for all to basic services. They can promote innovative nature-based solutions, respect for traditional knowledge and cultural diversity, exercise environmental stewardship and duty of care, build an ethic of global and local citizenship, promote good governance, tolerance, and reconciliation, and build safe, inclusive and peaceful societies. It has become more urgent than ever to promote and disseminate morals, values, behaviours and creative solutions conducive to attaining the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. This universal agenda, and the emerging understanding of the points of religious agreement in environmental ethics, can be the corner stones for a common vision that enhances the role of religion and culture in achieving sustainability. Inter-faith and inter-cultural dialogue can converge on a few insights, among them that of nature as sacred, and the rights of nature, both of which are shared by most organized religions and indigenous peoples, and many natural scientists. Among the many positive actions – large and small – are the 2030 Agenda and SDGs, and the Paris Climate Change. Agreement||the actions of faith based declarations and statements, especially in relation to climate change||the actions of indigenous cultural leaders in support of greater rights and respect of cultural diversity||and the 7 million voices that engaged in vision setting in the run up to the 2030 Agenda and SDGs. These have all come together in a historic year of 2015, and provide tremendous opportunities for building a global partnership for shifting the paradigm and addressing the crucial challenges of our era, both for humanity today as well as for future generations.


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2016
Reports and Books
Stratégie méditerranéenne pour le développement pour le développement durable 2016-2025: Investir dans la durabilité environnementale pour atteindre le développement économique et social
United Nations Environment Programme. Mediterranean Action Plan

Les objectifs généraux de la Stratégie sont les suivants : Fournir un cadre politique stratégique pour assurer un futur durable à la Région Méditerranée||Adapter les engagements internationaux aux conditions régionales, guider les stratégies nationales et stimuler la coopération régionale pour la réalisation des objectifs de développement durable||Lier la nécessité de protéger l’environnement avec le développement socio-économique.


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2016