Tagged on: Resource efficiency

Reports and Books
Options for decoupling economic growth from water use and water pollution: A report of the Water Working Group of the International Resource Panel: Summary for policy makers
United Nations Environment Programme

Global trends point to a relative decoupling of water – that is, the rate of water resource use is increasing at a rate slower than that of economic growth. The Options for Decoupling Economic Growth from Water Use and Water Pollution report provides an independent assessment of technological and policy-relevant tools and approaches that can be used to achieve the decoupling of water resources from economic development while considering environmental and welfare impacts over the full life cycle. To head off a looming water resource crisis, meet global water demand, and sustain economic growth and human wellbeing, global action for decoupling water from economic growth is essential. The report puts forward a package of policy and practical responses based on decoupling strategies to help the forward looking policy-maker in achieving global aspirations for water sustainability.


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2015
Reports and Books
The United Nations Environment Programme and the 2030 Agenda: Global Action for People and the Planet
United Nations Environment Programme

Unemployment, resource scarcity, climate change, food insecurity and inequity all signal the need for radical change in our societies. To bring this change, the entire UN system must meet the challenge of delivering sustainable development with shared prosperity for all, within the ecological limits of our planet. The UN’s role in this transformation is to assist countries to implement the economic, social and environmental dimensions of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in a balanced and integrated manner.


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2015
Reports and Books
Investing in Natural Capital for a Sustainable Future in the Greater Mekong Subregion
Asian Development Bank

Natural capital has been a key contributor to the subregion’s rapid economic growth over the past 3 decades or so. However, the subregion’s key natural capital stocks are in a state of decline. This is evident by the degradation of arable land||considerable losses in forests, wetlands, and mangroves||and many species of fauna and flora becoming endangered or even extinct. The Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) is poised to continue developing at a significant pace.


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2015
Reports and Books
The State of Food and Agriculture
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) on reducing poverty have been met by many countries, yet many others lag behind and the post-2015 challenge will be the full eradication of poverty and hunger. Many developing countries increasingly recognize that social protection measures are needed to relieve the immediate deprivation of people living in poverty and to prevent others from falling into poverty when a crisis strikes.


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2015
Reports and Books
ECGFS Background Paper B: International Experience
United Nations Environment Programme

In 2014 the Research Bureau of the People’s Bank of China convened a Green Finance Task Force made up of 40 experts from ministries, financial regulators, academics, banks and other financial institutions, complemented by international experts brought together by the UNEP Inquiry to consider the steps that China could take to establish a green financial system.This detailed background report on the lessons from international experience complements the main report."


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2015
Reports and Books
Stock Exchanges and Sustainability
United Nations Environment Programme

Stock exchanges have historically played an important role in economic growth and development through enabling effective capital allocation. However, exchanges and markets more broadly have changed over time, in structure, interconnectedness and rate of activity. This has happened against a backdrop of growing recognition of the unsustainability of the current economic growth path in both social and environmental terms. Sustainability advocates and others have identified stock exchanges and evolving market structure as both contributors to the problem and a potential partner in the solution. Markets and by extension, the companies listed on exchanges and the investors in those companies, are increasingly short-term in outlook and appear not to value the environmental and social impact of corporate behaviour. This is due to a range of factors including (but not limited to) the lack of disclosure by listed companies of relevant environmental, social and governance information, as well as an evolving market structure and trading behaviour that favours trading above investing. Given that it is increasingly clear that environmental and social issues have an impact on corporate performance, exchanges (or the relevant securities regulators) must require disclosure in the same way that financial disclosure is required. Exchanges also have a role to play in developing sustainability indices, ratings and associated products that are useful to investors as they seek to shift to more sustainable investment. More fundamentally, it is necessary to address some of the challenges posed by new market structures. This requires improving the understanding of how the current and evolving market structure impacts on the core capital raising and allocation function of markets and redefining market quality to reflect this linkage. Markets will not, however, even if optimized for sustainability, solve the sustainability challenge, as they should reflect societal norms and expectations, rather than driving them.


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2015
Reports and Books
Environmental sustainability for human well-being in the Post 2015 Development Agenda
United Nations Environment Programme

Environmental sustainability is a prerequisite for sustained and irreversible socioeconomic development and poverty eradication. The present information note focuses on the interlinkages between the environmental, social and economic dimensions. Five key transformational issues can be synthesized from a review of these interlinkages.


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2015
Reports and Books
ECGFS Detailed Recommendation 2: Green Funds
United Nations Environment Programme

In 2014 the Research Bureau of the People’s Bank of China convened a Green Finance Task Force made up of 40 experts from ministries, financial regulators, academics, banks and other financial institutions, complemented by international experts brought together by the UNEP Inquiry to consider the steps that China could take to establish a green financial system.This detailed report on one of the fourteen recommenda4ions complements the main report."


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2015
Reports and Books
The State of Food Insecurity in the World
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, IFAD and WFP

This year´s annual State of Food Insecurity in the World report takes stock of progress made towards achieving the internationally established hunger targets, and reflects on what needs to be done, as we transition to the new post-2015 Sustainable Development Agenda.


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2015
Reports and Books
ECGFS Detailed Recommendation 3: Green the Development Banks
United Nations Environment Programme

In 2014 the Research Bureau of the People’s Bank of China convened a Green Finance Task Force made up of 40 experts from ministries, financial regulators, academics, banks and other financial institutions, complemen4ed by international experts brought together by the UNEP Inquiry to consider the steps that China could take to establish a green financial system.This detailed report on one of the fourteen recommendations complements the main report."


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2015