Tagged on: Ecosystem management

Annual Report
UN Environment 2016 Annual Report: Empowering People to Protect the Planet
United Nations Environment Programme

Annual report


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2016
Reports and Books
Regional State of the coast Report Western Indian Ocean: Split
United Nations Environment Programme, Bosire, Jared, Paula, José, Schleyer, Michael H.
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2015
Reports and Books
Interim Assessment of Revised National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans (NBSAPS)
United Nations Environment Programme, Fridtjof nansens instiutt, Global Environment Facility, UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC)

This interim assessment of post-2010 NBSAPs undertakes a preliminary review of how countries have considered the Strategic Plan of the CBD and the readiness to achieve the Aichi Targets at national level.


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2015
Reports and Books
International Environmental Law-making and Diplomacy Review 2014
United Nations Environment Programme, University of Eastern Finland

In October 2014, the University of Eastern Finland and UNEP held the eleventh joint Course on Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEAs) in Joensuu, Finland. The papers compiled in this volume of the Review are based on lectures presented on the theme of environmental security.


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2015
Reports and Books
Nitrogen: Strategies for resolving an urgent environmental problem
German Advisory Council on the Environment

The excessive release of nitrogen compounds into the environment is one of the biggest problems of our time. Nitrogen compounds, such as nitrogen oxides and ammonia, pollute the environment and endanger human health in numerous and complex ways.


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2015
Reports and Books
Sources, Fate and Effects of Microplastics in the Marine Environment: A Global Assessment
Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection (GESAMP)

The GESAMP assessment focuses on a category of plastic debris termed ‘microplastics’. These small pieces of plastic may enter the ocean as such, or may result from the fragmentation of larger items through the influence of UV radiation. Section 1 provides an introduction to the problem of microplastics in the marine environment, and the rationale for the assessment. The principal purpose of the assessment is to provide an improved evidence base, to support policy and management decisions on measures that might be adopted to reduce the input of microplastics to the oceans. The GESAMP assessment can be considered as contributing to a more formal Assessment Framework, such as the Driver-Pressure-State-Impact- Response (DPSIR) Assessment Framework, which is introduced in Section 2.


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2015
Reports and Books
World Ocean Review 4, Sustainable Use of Our Oceans – Making Ideas Work
World Ocean Review(WOR)

Time brings change. In our fast-moving age, the Earth, and therefore also Nature and our society, are changing ever more rapidly. With high population growth and the progressive diversification of labour, we humans are changing the face of our planet to an unprecedented extent. Some of the greatest challenges result from growing complexity, interconnectedness and linkages across the globe: examples are the increasing integration of international financial markets and the economic interdependence of consumer and producer societies. In a globalized world, comprehending all that happens in politics, the economy and the cultural sphere has become an ever more difficult task. Our scientific knowledge, too, has grown apace. It has become more diverse and multifaceted, creating something of a barrier to understanding and making the lessons to be learned from science less accessible. This applies especially to our oceans. Over recent decades, we have learned, for example, that chemical, biological and physical processes in the marine environment influence each other and cannot be viewed in isolation, requiring a more integrated approach to our interpretation of scientific data and showing that there are no simple answers to the multitude of questions arising in modern marine research. Indeed, as we increasingly recognize that marine ecosystems are worth protecting, many questions and expectations arise. We must begin, therefore, by being mindful of the essentials: by establishing clarity on the concepts and terminology and how to communicate them to a wider public, and being clear about the fundamental principles guiding our actions.


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2015
Reports and Books
UNEP Regional Office for North America Newsletter
United Nations Environment Programme

UNEP Regional Office for North America December 2015 Newsletter


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2015
Reports and Books
The Regional State of the Coast Report: Western Indian Ocean
United Nations Environment Programme

The Regional State of Coast Report for the western Indian Ocean (WIO) is the first comprehensive regional synthesis to provide insights into the enormous economic potential around the WIO, the consequential demand for marine ecosystem goods and services to match the increasing human population, the pace and scale of environmental changes taking place in the region and the opportunities to avoid serious degradation in one of the world’s unique and highly biodiverse oceans. The report goes a step further and presents exploratory scenarios and policy analysis to better inform anticipatory planning and management of coastal and marine resources.


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2015
Reports and Books
Forest Ecosystems in the Transition to a Green Economy and the Role of REDD+ in the United Republic of Tanzania
United Nations Environment Programme, UN-REDD Programme, Tanzania Forest Services, Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism

The main objective of this study is to assess whether there is an economic rationale for the reduction of deforestation in the United Republic of Tanzania, by calculating the economic costs and benefits based on current levels of deforestation. The study is part of a range of activities offered by the UN-REDD Programme in support of the Tanzanian Government. REDD+1 is a concept designed to reward developing countries for their verified reductions or removals of forest carbon emissions compared to a forest reference level or forest reference emission level that complies with the relevant safeguards.


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2015