Tagged on: Disasters and conflict

Chapters and Articles
Global Outlook for Ice and Snow: Chapter 7 - Frozen ground
United Nations Environment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme

Permafrost temperatures have increased during the last 20–30 years in almost all areas of the Northern Hemisphere. An increase in the depth of the active layer above the permafrost, which thaws in the summer, is less certain. Further increases in air temperatures predicted for the 21st century are projected to initiate widespread permafrost thawing in the subarctic and in mountain regions in both hemispheres. Widespread thawing of permafrost will speed up the decomposition of organic material previously held frozen in permafrost, emitting large amounts of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Thawing of ice-rich permafrost may also have serious consequences for ecosystems and infrastructure, and in mountain regions, may reduce the stability of slopes and increase the danger of rock falls and landslides


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Reports and Books
Strategic Environmental Policy Assessment: FYR of Macedonia: A review of Environmental Priorities for International Cooperation
United Nations Environment Programme

This report was designed to address the following principal objectives: i) Identification of national needs in the environment sector with regard to policy development and implementation; and ii) Identification of corresponding strategic areas for support by the international community, with particular reference to UNDP .


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Reports and Books
Climate Change in Afghanistan: What Does It Mean for Rural Livelihoods and Food Security? 
United Nations Environment Programme

In this report, we show how drought and flood risks have changed over the past thirty years, and what impact this has had on rural livelihoods and food security in the country. The aim is to inform national-level prioritization of areas and livelihoods groups for climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction programmes.


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Reports and Books
Darfur: Water Supply in a Vulnerable Environment - Phase two of Tearfund’s Darfur Environment Study
United Nations Environment Programme

As a result of the conflict Darfur has unprecedented concentrations of population imposing high localised demands on water resources. This study focuses on the water needs of the internally displaced persons (IDPs) in camps. This report finds that the main risk to groundwater supplies in Darfur’s camps is of water shortages in a year of low rainfall in vulnerable camps. Darfur’s rainfall is highly variable but so far a significant dry year has not occurred since the beginning of the current conflict. It is this risk rather than a protracted drying process that needs to be addressed by the relief community. The report identifies 21 camps that are potentially vulnerable to groundwater depletion in a dry year.


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Reports and Books
On the Hoof Livestock Trade in Darfur: Livestock Trade in Darfur
United Nations Environment Programme

This study set out to understand what has happened to the livestock trade in the greater Darfur region during the conflict years: how it has responded to the constantly shifting conflict dynamics since 2003, how it has adapted, and to what extent (if at all) it has recovered. It also set out to identify how the livestock trade can be supported in order to better sustain the livelihoods of different groups in Darfur, both while the conflict continues and in the longer term to support the eventual recovery of Darfur’s economy and to contribute to the national economy. It is estimated that Darfur’s livestock account for between one-quarter and one-third of Sudan’s livestock resources post-secession.


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Reports and Books
Pastoralism in Practice: Monitoring Livestock mobility in Contemporary Sudan
United Nations Environment Programme

Given the spotlight on livestock mobility, this study aimed to develop and pilot new methods and approaches to investigating livestock mobility, in order to review the resilience of the pastoralist systems and related adaptations, and the wider trends influencing this. This report follows the completion of the development and pilot phase of the research and presents selected findings from the first three to five months of monitoring. While this is sufficient to pilot the methodological innovation, it is insufficient to capture all the seasons within the annual cycle.


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Factsheets
Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland: Site Specific Fact Sheets: Korokoro
United Nations Environment Programme

This fact sheet is part of a series prepared as part of the Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). It provides the observations and results from one of the individual sites studied in detail, plus the specific risk reduction measures for follow-up action.
This fact sheet should be read in conjunction with the main assessment report.


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Factsheets
Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland: Site Specific Fact Sheets: Nkeleoken - Alode (002-002)
United Nations Environment Programme

Site fact sheet for Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland


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Summaries
Livelihood security: Climate Change, Conflict and Migration in the Sahel - Executive summary
United Nations Environment Programme

The Sahelian countries (CILSS) are among the poorest countries in the world with the most degraded environments. They are also among the countries that are the most vulnerable to the estimated effects of climate change. This makes the region an area to focus regional and international attention on, in respect to the possible effects of climate change and its potential linkages to migration and/or conflict. This study focuses on the nine countries that form the Permanent Inter-State Committee for Drought Control in the Sahel namely, Senegal, Guinea Bissau, Cape Verde, Mauritania, Mali, Chad, Niger, Gambia and Burkina Faso.


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Chapters and Articles
Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland - Executive Summary and Introduction
United Nations Environment Programme

A major new independent scientific assessment, carried out by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), shows that pollution from over 50 years of oil operations in the region has penetrated further and deeper than many may have supposed. The assessment has been unprecedented. Over a 14-month period, the UNEP team examined more than 200 locations, surveyed 122 kilometers of pipeline rights of way, reviewed more than 5,000 medical records and engaged over 23,000 people at local community meetings. The environmental restoration of Ogoniland could prove to be the world's most wide-ranging and long term oil clean-up exercise ever undertaken if contaminated drinking water, land, creeks and important ecosystems such as mangroves are to be brought back to full, productive health. The report key findings are alarming both in terms of human health protection and environmental protection.


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