Tagged on: Disasters and conflict

Reports and Books
Destitution, Distortion and Deforestation: The Impact of Conflict on the Timber and Woodfuel Trade in Darfur
United Nations Environment Programme

There is growing concern about the environmental impact of conflict in Darfur, in particular the impact on Darfur’s forest resources, which were already being depleted at an estimated rate of one percent per annum before the conflict. This study begins to investigate these impacts by exploring how the trade in timber and woodfuel has changed since the conflict began, exploring the impact of the massive displacement of Darfur’s population to the main urban centres, of the unprecedented international presence in Darfur, and of humanitarian programming. te this urgent agenda.


Download: English, Arabic
Factsheets
Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland: Site Specific Fact Sheets: Kwawa
United Nations Environment Programme

This fact sheet is part of a series prepared as part of the Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). It provides the observations and results from one of the individual sites studied in detail, plus the specific risk reduction measures for follow-up action.
This fact sheet should be read in conjunction with the main assessment report.


Download: English
Reports and Books
Humanitarian Action and the Environment
United Nations Environment Programme, Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs

Disasters and conflicts, as well as relief and recovery operations, impact the environment in ways that threaten human life, health, livelihoods and security. Failure to address these risks can undermine the relief process, causing additional loss of life, displacement, aid dependency and increased vulnerability. Disaster managers and humanitarian workers can take action to avoid this. This document helps to explain how.


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Reports and Books
Sudan: Post-conflict Environmental Assessment
United Nations Environment Programme

The goal of the UNEP post-conflict environmental assessment for Sudan was to develop a solid technical basis for medium-term (1-5 years) corrective action in the field of environmental protection and sustainable development. This goal was expanded into five objectives: 1. Provide neutral and objective information on the most critical environmental problems facing the country, and on the potential risks to human health, livelihoods and ecosystem services; 2. Recommend strategic priorities for sustainable resource management and identify the actors, timelines and costs necessary for implementation; 3. Facilitate the development of national environmental policy and strengthen the capacity for national environmental governance; 4. Raise awareness and catalyse financial support for environmental projects by national authorities, UN actors, NGOs and donors; and 5. Integrate environmental issues into the recovery and reconstruction process. This report aims to present the post-conflict environmental issues for Sudan in a single concise document accessible to a wide audience of non-experts.


Download: English, Français, Arabic
Reports and Books
Pastoralism in Practice: Monitoring Livestock mobility in Contemporary Sudan
United Nations Environment Programme

Given the spotlight on livestock mobility, this study aimed to develop and pilot new methods and approaches to investigating livestock mobility, in order to review the resilience of the pastoralist systems and related adaptations, and the wider trends influencing this. This report follows the completion of the development and pilot phase of the research and presents selected findings from the first three to five months of monitoring. While this is sufficient to pilot the methodological innovation, it is insufficient to capture all the seasons within the annual cycle.


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Factsheets
Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland: Site Specific Fact Sheets: Korokoro
United Nations Environment Programme

This fact sheet is part of a series prepared as part of the Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). It provides the observations and results from one of the individual sites studied in detail, plus the specific risk reduction measures for follow-up action.
This fact sheet should be read in conjunction with the main assessment report.


Download: English
Factsheets
Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland: Site Specific Fact Sheets: Bera (019-001)
United Nations Environment Programme

This fact sheet is part of a series prepared as part of the Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). It provides the observations and results from one of the individual sites studied in detail, plus the specific risk reduction measures for follow-up action.
This fact sheet should be read in conjunction with the main assessment report.


Download: English
Factsheets
Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland: Site Specific Fact Sheets: Nsioken - Akpajo (003-001)
United Nations Environment Programme

Site fact sheet for Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland


Download: English
Chapters and Articles
Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland Chapter 5: Assessment of Vegetation, Aquatic and Public Health Issues
United Nations Environment Programme

In this chapter, contamination of non-site specific environmental media, such as air and surface water, is discussed, as is the fate of receptors such as human beings, fish and mangroves, all of which can receive pollution from more than one source. issues of contamination and ensuing issues of contamination and ensuing environmental damage are consequences of oil industry operations that are impacting the health, welfare and livelihoods of the Ogoni community.


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Reports and Books, Manuals and Guides
Hazard and Climate Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment (HCVCA) Toolkit: The Afghanistan Resilience Consortium’s Guide to Assessing community Resilience and Vulnerability to Natural Hazards and Climate Change in Afghanistan
United Nations Environment Programme, Afghanistan Resilience Consortium

The following Hazard and Climate Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment (HCVCA) toolkit has been developed based on in country experience applying community-based and participatory tools with more than 450 communities across eight of Afghanistan’s most hazard-prone provinces. The toolkit objective is to provide development practitioners, community leaders, and decision-makers a framework for researching, analysing, and understanding the underlying causes of vulnerability to natural hazards and climate change in rural Afghanistan. Armed with this greater knowledge, it is hoped that a foundation for resilience-building activities can be established and concrete actions can be taken to better prepare rural Afghanistan’s communities against natural hazards and the adverse impacts of climate change.


Download: English