Tagged on: Disasters and conflict

Policy and Strategy Documents
National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan (NBSAP)
United Nations Environment Programme

This National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan (NBSAP) for Afghanistan has been prepared by the National Environmental Protection Agency of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, with technical and advisory inputs from relevant government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, international development organizations and user groups at both national and provincial levels. The NBSAP’s purpose is two-fold: firstly, to provide the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan with a policy document that can help guide the development of the country’s future biodiversity conservation and management programming, and secondly to communicate biodiversity conservation priorities in Afghanistan to the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (a requirement of all countries acceding to the Convention), to other government agencies in Afghanistan, and to Afghanistan’s development partners.


Download: Dari
Reports and Books
Environmental Baseline Study for the Proposed Relocationing of the UNSOA Logistics Base Mombasa, Kenya
United Nations Environment Programme

The purpose of this environmental baseline study (EBS) is to identify, assess, and document the initial environmental conditions on the site. The results from the EBS will be able to serve as a future reference point (baseline), as the EBS is to be periodically updated for the location. In addition to internal use within the mission, the baseline study is also to be held on file for possible use, when required, in discussions withthe host country, regarding damage or pollution claimed to have been caused by the mission.


Download: English
Manuals and Guides
Training Manual for Coastal Managers on Disaster Risk Reduction
United Nations Environment Programme

The main objective of the Disaster Risk Reduction training module is to build capacity of coastal resources managers in the coastal district on DRR by introducing DRR concepts, issues and opportunities for integrating DRR into coastal resources management projects and activities. Capacity building is the action needed to enhance the ability of individuals, institutions and systems to make and implement decisions and perform functions in an effective, efficient and sustainable manner. There are three capacity levels viz. individual, institutional and systemic.


Download: English
Factsheets
Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland: Site Specific Fact Sheets: Wiibusuu - Kpean
United Nations Environment Programme

This fact sheet is part of a series prepared as part of the Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). It provides the observations and results from one of the individual sites studied in detail, plus the specific risk reduction measures for follow-up action.
This fact sheet should be read in conjunction with the main assessment report.


Download: English
Factsheets
Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland: Site Specific Fact Sheets: Obaji Oken - Ogale (004-006)
United Nations Environment Programme

Site fact sheet for Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland


Download: English
Factsheets
Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland: Site Specific Fact Sheets: Bera (019-001)
United Nations Environment Programme

This fact sheet is part of a series prepared as part of the Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). It provides the observations and results from one of the individual sites studied in detail, plus the specific risk reduction measures for follow-up action.
This fact sheet should be read in conjunction with the main assessment report.


Download: English
Factsheets
Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland: Site Specific Fact Sheets: Nsioken - Akpajo (003-001)
United Nations Environment Programme

Site fact sheet for Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland


Download: English
Chapters and Articles
Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland Chapter 5: Assessment of Vegetation, Aquatic and Public Health Issues
United Nations Environment Programme

In this chapter, contamination of non-site specific environmental media, such as air and surface water, is discussed, as is the fate of receptors such as human beings, fish and mangroves, all of which can receive pollution from more than one source. issues of contamination and ensuing issues of contamination and ensuing environmental damage are consequences of oil industry operations that are impacting the health, welfare and livelihoods of the Ogoni community.


Download: English
Reports and Books, Manuals and Guides
Hazard and Climate Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment (HCVCA) Toolkit: The Afghanistan Resilience Consortium’s Guide to Assessing community Resilience and Vulnerability to Natural Hazards and Climate Change in Afghanistan
United Nations Environment Programme, Afghanistan Resilience Consortium

The following Hazard and Climate Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment (HCVCA) toolkit has been developed based on in country experience applying community-based and participatory tools with more than 450 communities across eight of Afghanistan’s most hazard-prone provinces. The toolkit objective is to provide development practitioners, community leaders, and decision-makers a framework for researching, analysing, and understanding the underlying causes of vulnerability to natural hazards and climate change in rural Afghanistan. Armed with this greater knowledge, it is hoped that a foundation for resilience-building activities can be established and concrete actions can be taken to better prepare rural Afghanistan’s communities against natural hazards and the adverse impacts of climate change.


Download: English
Factsheets
Environmental Audit of the Sites Impacted by the "Probo Koala" Toxic Waste Dumping in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire - Site 16: Plateau Dokoui 1
United Nations Environment Programme

On 19 August 2006, the ship Probo Koala off-loaded 528 cubic meters of liquid wastes in the port of Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. The material was transferred onto tanker trucks operated by a local contractor, and dumped in twelve different locations around the city. In June 2012, UN Environment received a formal request from the Government of Côte d’Ivoire to undertake an independent and scientific environmental audit of the sites that were impacted by the dumping of wastes of the Probo Koala. The Government wished for UN Environment to determine whether the sites continued to pose risks for the environment or for public health, and to make recommendations about additional or corrective clean-up measures that would need to be carried out in case contamination was detected.


Download: English, French