Tagged on: Discussion and Working documents

Workplan and Budget for the Specially Protected Areas And Wildlife (SPAW) Subprogramme for the 2019 - 2020 Biennium
United Nations Environment Programme, Caribbean Environment Programme

This Workplan covers the 2019 - 2020 biennium and sets out the priorities for the Regional Programme on Specially Protected Areas and Wildlife in the Wider Caribbean Region (SPAW). During this period, the Workplan will focus on activities that assist with the implementation of the SPAW Protocol and its coordination with other regional programmes and organizations dealing with biodiversity conservation and management, particularly regarding protected areas and wildlife as well as relevant global initiatives and multilateral environmental agreements


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2018
SDG 14 as an Entry to Delivery of other Sustainable Development Goals - Session 3: Supporting SDG Delivery Paper 1
Western Indian Ocean Marine Science Association

The ocean is vital to all life on Earth and fundamental for our survival and well being. In the Western Indian Ocean(WIO) region, it provides essential ecosystem services, food, and opportunities for sustainable economic growth, and many cultural and recreational activities for the 65 million people that live within 10 km of the coast (Burke et al., 2011). Further, the Nairobi Convention Contracting Parties derive US$ 25 billion per year (UNEP/ Nairobi Convention Secretariat, 2009) from tourism, fisheries, coastal agriculture, mining, mariculture, and ports and coastal transport sectors.


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2018
Food for thoughts - Group 3: Mauritius, Ethiopia & Zambia
United Nations Environment Programme
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2018
Integrated Management of the Marine and Coastal Resources of the Northern Mozambique Channel: White Paper for the Science-Policy Workshop of the 9th Conference of Parties to the Nairobi Convention, 9-11 July 2018
World Wide Fund for Nature, Coastal Oceans Research and Development in the Indian Ocean

The Northern Mozambique Channel (NMC) area is under the jurisdiction of Madagascar, Mozambique, Tanzania, France, Seychelles and the Comoros, covering an area of approximately 700,000 km2. It is among the world's richest regions for biodiversity. It serves as a biological reservoir for the entire Eastern African coast, in particular for coral reefs and associated ecosystems, and is an important breeding and foraging areas for flagship marine and migratory species. The human coastal population of the NMC is currently 10 million (expected to grow to 22-25 million in 2050) and is largely dependent on healthy and productive ecosystems through fishing, coastal agriculture, and tourism. Prior documents submitted in the Nairobi Convention COPs have detailed the importance of the region in terms of its biodiversity, value of its ecosystems, population needs, and future development prospects, including of natural gas, which have precipitated past Decisions acknowledging the importance of trans-boundary approaches to maintain the health and vitality of the region for its people to prosper (Decisions from Conferences of Parties of the Nairobi Convention have facilitated the development of activities and consultations including the formulation of this project, including Decision CP7/1 (work programme) and Decision CP8/6 (Support to Implementation of Projects).


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2018
English Speaking Working Group: Egypt, Finland, Kirgizstan, Republic of Moldova, Ukraine, BRS
United Nations Environment Programme

Experiences and challenges on NIP development, update and implementation - Reports from the 6 working groups during the workshop


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2018
Framework for Scaling up Investments in Priority Health and Environment Interventions - Third Inter-Ministerial Conference on Health and Environment in Africa
World Health Organization, United Nations Environment Programme

It is well established that socioeconomic development processes often result in alterations of ecosystems with significant consequences on human health. The health and environment sectors are often left to mitigate such consequences with limited financial resources and at their own cost. The Libreville Declaration on Health and Environment in Africa is the main policy framework for addressing health and environment challenges coherently. To date, countries have set their health and environment priorities and some have prepared their national plans of joint action. It is now time to scale up investments for their implementation. This Framework aims at stimulating government investments in large-scale health and environment development projects or programmes with a potential impact on socioeconomic development. The Framework promotes the strengthening and institutionalization of country task teams for implementing the Libreville Declaration, the identification and selection of best practices and locally appropriate standards in the services and interventions offered to local communities, the development of funding proposals that are directly linked to national development objectives and the appropriate use of existing funding opportunities.


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2018
Proposed work programme for the period 2018–2022 for the implementation of the Nairobi Convention: Note by the Secretariat
United Nations Environment Programme

In collaboration with its partners, the secretariat of the Nairobi Convention for the Protection, Management and Development of the Marine and Coastal Environment of the Western Indian Ocean Region has developed a new work partnership programme for the period 2018–2022. By decision CP.8/1 of their eighth meeting, in June 2015, the Contracting Parties to the Nairobi Convention requested the secretariat to develop a new work programme for adoption at their ninth meeting. The 2018–2022 work programme maintains the momentum of the 2013–2017 work programme by building on its successes and by strengthening and multiplying the linkages between partners, programmes and projects in the Western Indian Ocean region.


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2018
Conservation and Management of Chondrichthyans (sharks, rays and chimaeras) in the Western Indian Ocean - Session 8: From Science to Policy Paper 1
Wildlife Conservation Society

The Western Indian Ocean (WIO) has been identified as a global hotspot for chondrichthyan diversity, with 130 shark, 86 batoid (wedgefishes, skates and rays) and 11 chimaera species identified to date. The WIO is one of four global hotspots for chondrichthyan evolutionary distinctiveness, giving the region’s chondrichthyans a high irreplaceability index, and highlighting the need for their conservation.


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2018
Group : Tunisie et Maroc
United Nations Environment Programme
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2018
Development of the Western Indian Ocean Action Plan on Marine Litter and Microplastics - Session 5: Management of Marine Litter and Municipal Wastewater in the Western Indian Ocean Paper 1
Institute of Marine Sciences of the University of Dar es Salaam

Marine litter and micro-plastics has recently taken a top slot in the political and public agenda on the health and integrity of the world’s oceans. Over 80% of marine pollution that constitute marine litter and micro-plastics is from land based sources , largely associated with diverse anthropogenic activities such as increasing use of synthetic materials, industrialization and urbanization of coastal areas, where disposal and waste management practices are inadequate. To effectively manage marine litter, an adequate knowledge is necessary about drivers, sources, types, amount and dispersion. Policy measures are then needed to address the generation of marine litter and micro-plastics, in particular those that can be prevented at the sources.


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2018