Newsletter
Regional Office for Africa newsletter
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

Newsletter


Download: English
2016
Monograph:-Guidelines
YouthXchange green skills and lifestyles guidebook
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and United Nations Educational, Scientifi c and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)

This publication was developed as a primer for youth on the green economy, particularly since there are no youth-friendly publication that explain this issue to youth. This publication enables youth to better familiarize themselves with the green economy and the skills needed for it (e.g. engaging in social innovation and green entrepreneurship).


Download: English
2016
Technical Report
Marine litter legislation: A toolkit for policymakers
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP); Environmental Law Institute

Far too much of the 300 million tonnes of plastic produced every year finds its way into our oceans, food chains and ecosystems, damaging our health in the process. Well-designed laws can help reverse this global trend. This report provides an overview of legislation that countries have implemented to tackle marine litter, focusing in particular on upstream solutions.


Download: English
2016
Infographics
Lead: Celebrating our achievements [Infographic]
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

Lead is a widely used metal that is harmful to human health and the environment


Download: English
2016
Infographics
Lead: Did you know? - Part 2 [Infographic]
United Nations Environment Programme

Lead is a widely used metal that is harmful to human health and the environment


Download: English
2016
Infographics
Lead: Did you know? - Part 1 [Infographic]
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

Lead is a widely used metal that is harmful to human health and the environment


Download: English
2016
Monograph
The global innovative index 2016: Winning with global innovation
Johnson Cornell University

Innovation is now widely recognized as a central driver of economic growth and development. The Global Innovation Index (GII) aims to capture the multi-dimensional facets of innovation by providing a rich database of detailed metrics for 128 economies, which represent 92.8% of the world’s population and 97.9% of global GDP. As UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon noted at the UN Economic and Social Council in 2013, the GII is a ‘unique tool for refining innovation policies… for providing an accurate picture on the role of science, technology and innovation in sustainable development’. Since the first edition of the GII, science and innovation have become more open, collaborative, and geographically dispersed. As the quest for innovative solutions expands, the likelihood of technological breakthroughs or affordable innovations—in areas as varied as health and the environment—increases. Yet innovation has sometimes not been portrayed as a global win-win proposition. On the contrary, most metrics and policies are designed at and for the national level. The analysis in this year’s edition, The Global Innovation Index 2016: Winning with Global Innovation, is dedicated to this theme, paving the way for improved policy making that takes into account today’s potential for collaborative global innovation.


Download: English
2016
Infographics
Lead: What can you do? [Infographic]
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

Lead is a widely used metal that is harmful to human health and the environment


Download: English
2016
Monograph
Integrated assessment of short-lived climate pollutants in Latin America and the Caribbean: Summary for decision makers
United Nations Environment Programme

In 2011, two scientific global assessments coordinated by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) identified a number of win-win measures for near-term climate change and clean air benefits. Implementation of these cost-effective and readily available measures, which target reducing emissions of short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) in key sectors, can bring rapid and multiple benefits for human well-being and support countries achieve their development objectives, while simultaneously increasing their ambition for climate mitigation in the near term. The reduction in SLCP emissions should, however, be done in parallel with the reduction in carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions.


Download: English
2016
Infographics
Lead: How are children exposed to lead? [Infographic]
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

Lead is a widely used metal that is harmful to human health and the environment


Download: English
2016