Book/Report
The Status of Climate Change Litigation : A Global Review
United Nations Environment Programme, Columbia University, Sabin Center for Climate Change Law

This report provides judges, advocates, researchers,and the international community with an of-the moment survey of global climate change litigation, an overview of litigation trends, and descriptions of key issues that courts must resolve in the course of climate change cases. One purpose of this report is to assist judges in understanding the nature and goals of different types of climate change cases, issues that are common to these cases, and how the particularities of political, legal, and environmental settings factor in to their resolution. Another goal is to contribute to a common language among practitioners around the world working to address climate change through the courts.


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Book/Report
Promoting Chemical Safety Management in Ports and along Transport Routes of Dangerous Goods: Case Studies from Africa
United Nations Environment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme

UN Environment and the International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) have collaborated since 2009 to build capacities in Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) on implementing effective chemicals management approaches. As part of this partnership and within the context of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), UN Environment and ICCA implemented a project between 2013 and 2015, in collaboration with regional and national partners, entitled “Promoting Chemical Safety in the African Region”. According to priorities identified in the region, the project aimed to promote safe handling of hazardous chemicals and appropriate emergency preparedness and response practices in ports and along cross-border transport routes.
The project was implemented in two main ports of Africa - as key entry points of imported chemicals to the region - and the cross-border transport routes to neighbouring land-locked countries. The two sites involved were the Port of Tema in Ghana and the transport routes serving Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger in West Africa; and the Port of Mombasa in Kenya and the transport routes serving Burundi, DR Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Southern Sudan, Northern Tanzania, and Uganda in East Africa. Project activities included four capacity-building and training workshops on safe handling and transport of dangerous goods, a mapping of main stakeholders relevant to chemical safety practices in both sites, a mapping of hazards and hotspots in both ports and along cross-border transport routes, assessment of current emergency response plans, and two sub-regional events to disseminate project results and best practices.
Activities were implemented in collaboration with the National Cleaner Production Centres of Ghana and Kenya and involved environmental, port and maritime authorities, as well as specific SMEs providing services on storage and transport of chemicals in the demonstration sites. UN Environment and ICCA also collaborated with the Government Chemist Laboratory Agency of Tanzania to host a last sub-regional dissemination workshop in Dar es Salaam, as a further contribution to share lessons learned in the region.
Specific methodologies such as UN Environment Respon¬sible Production and the Awareness and Preparedness for Emergencies at Local Level (APELL), as well as ICCA Responsible Care Framework and Global Product Strategy (GPS), were used as the main methodologies for capacity building throughout the project.
Outcomes of the project include a clear understanding of the chemical hazards present in the demonstration sites and transport routes and assessment of the current emergency response plans, enhanced capacities of national authorities and SMEs on handling and transport of dangerous goods, and promotion of regular improvements and stakeholder consultations on chemical safety and emergency preparedness in both ports.
This publication compiles case studies of the project’s activities. It is complemented by a package of resource materials on improving chemical safety that were used in the context of the project. The publication aims at providing valuable insights and lessons learned that can be of use to other countries and regions when replicating capacity-building activities on chemical safety in port areas and transport practices. It also provides recommendations for potential future activities.


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Booklet/Brochure
Roadmap for a Sustainable Financial System : Summary for Consultation
United Nations Environment Programme

UN Environment and the World Bank Group view the over-arching objective of a sound financial system as being to provide finance that meets the long-term needs of an inclusive, environmentally sustainable economy. While there is no single blueprint or unique pathway for creating such a “sustainable financial system”, it is possible to describe its many characteristics and progress towards it. The Roadmap initiative intends to design an action plan that moves towards a sustainable financial system, including its elements, sequencing and principal actors, and a basis for measuring progress. The Roadmap will build on the extensive experience of both partners and many other active in the field.


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Book chapter
Energy Profile: South Sudan
United Nations Environment Programme

Total production of electricity in 2015 was 28 ktoe, with 92.8 per cent from fossil fuels and 7.1 per cent from hydro sources. Final electricity consumption in 2015 was 16 ktoe.


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Book chapter
Energy Profile: Tanzania
United Nations Environment Programme

Total electricity production in 2015 was 555 ktoe, with 70.9 per cent from fossil fuels and 27.2 per cent from hydro sources, as shown in Table 2. Final consumption of electricity was 526 ktoe in 2015 (AFREC, 2015).


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Book chapter
Energy Profile: Togo
United Nations Environment Programme

Total electricity production in 2015 was 52 ktoe, with 71.1 per cent from fossil fuels and 23 per cent from hydro sources. Final consumption of electricity was 52 ktoe in 2015.


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Book chapter
Energy Profile: Uganda
United Nations Environment Programme

Total electricity production in 2015 was 276 ktoe with 74.6 per cent produced from hydro, 19 per cent from fossil fuels and 5.4 per cent from biofuels and waste. Final electricity consumption in the same year was 200 ktoe.


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Book chapter
Energy Profile: Zambia
United Nations Environment Programme

Total electricity production in 2015 was 1,025 ktoe, with 93.3 per cent from hydro and 6.5 per cent from fossil fuels. Final electricity consumption in the same year was 97 ktoe.


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Book chapter
Energy Profile: Zimbabwe
United Nations Environment Programme

Total production of electricity in 2015 was 762 ktoe, with 32.9 per cent from fossil fuels and 66.2 per cent from hydro sources. The final
consumption of electricity in 2015 was 761 ktoe.


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Book chapter
Energy Profile: Mauritius
United Nations Environment Programme

In 2015, total production of electricity was 228 ktoe, of which 92.1 per cent came from fossil fuels, 26.3 per cent from biofuels and waste and 3.9 per cent from hydro sources (Table 2). Final consumption of electricity in the same year was 210 ktoe (AFREC, 2015).


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