Guidelines
UNEP Access-to-Information Policy (Revised)
United Nations Environment Programme

UNEP Access-to-Information Policy


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2016
Assessment report, Book/Report, Global environment outlook (GEO)
Global Gender and Environment Outlook
United Nations Environment Programme

The GGEO provides an overview of current knowledge and
gives a first set of answers to the following key policy-relevant
questions:
• What social forces are producing the changes seen in the
environment, and are they gender-dependent?
• What are the large-scale consequences of ongoing
environmental changes for social systems and
human security, and are these consequences genderdifferentiated?
• What do future projections and outlooks look like, are
they gender-differentiated, and will there be different
outcomes for women and men?
• What actions could be taken for a more sustainable
future that would position women and men as equal
agents in taking such actions, and which socio-economic
factors could shape different outcomes and responses
for women and men?
We look forward to the uptake of GGEO’s findings throughout
the environmental sector at international and national levels


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2016
Infographic/Flyer
Financing the Change
United Nations Environment Programme
Download: English
2016
Brochure
UN Environment COP22 Events
United Nations Environment Programme

This brochure highlights key UN Environment events during COP22.


Download: cop22_Brochure_04-11.pdf
2016
Monograph
A framework for shaping sustainable lifestyles: determinants and strategies
United Nations Environment Programme

People make hundreds of thousands of decisions during the course of their lives. For the lucky among us, those decisions will vary widely. No matter how we choose, the lifestyles we end up living – or, in some cases, are forced to live – have a profound impact on our planet, affecting everything from how our economies run to the health of our environment. How we choose to live as a society and as individuals – what houses we choose and build, what food we eat and grow, how we spend our spare time, and what type of transport we use – will have an enormous impact on the trajectory of human history. This publication will help policymakers, individuals and other stakeholders understand what a holistic approach to lifestyle means and how different contexts require different lifestyle solutions. This publication does not set out to define what "the" sustainable lifestyle looks like. Instead, it can help guide a range of initiatives that enable lifestyle choices that contribute to sustainability


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2016
Toolkit
A toolkit for preparation of low carbon mobility plan
United Nations Environment Programme

The Toolkit for Comprehensive Mobility Plan (CMP) Revised (2014) is used as a starting point for the present toolkit. This toolkit for LCMP caters to a global audience, and provides a simplified approach for LCMP preparation for smaller cities, or cities in which no major investments are envisaged in the short-term. The toolkit has a specific focus on cities in less-developed and developing countries where significant infrastructure will be built to cater to a growing transportation demand and, therefore, land-use and transport policies can play an important role in shaping mobility demand and mode choice.


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2016
Map
UNEP in the Regions
United Nations Environment Programme

UNEP Global presence Map


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2016
Organogram
[Organogram]: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP): August 2016
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

UNEP Organigram


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2016
Monograph
The state of sustainable finance in the United States
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

While US financial institutions have at times enjoyed a reputation of being something of a laggard on sustainability issues versus their European counterparts, significant changes and innovations are under way which are beginning to drive meaningful change. Record levels of awareness on sustainability issues in the US, including from millennials, are accelerating activities such as: - Increased levels of sustainable and responsible investing. - An increased focus from the largest US banks and other financial institutions on sustainability risks, lending practices and related opportunities. - US insurance companies and related regulators are also developing and evolving sustainability risk frameworks. - Federal and State policies are accelerating the ongoing US low carbon energy transition. - Financial innovation is driving meaningful change in many investment sectors while social innovation and culture development also continue to evolve. With energy costs curves seen as changing for the long term, levelling the playing field for lower carbon energy production, and interest in having a positive impact with investment dollars from millennials on the rise, a top-down, bottom-up race is under way which has created an important new dynamic leading to these actions. Accelerating these trends further can help make the US a leader on both designing and enabling sustainable financial systems.


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2016
Monograph
Human rights and sustainable finance: exploring the relationship
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

In November 2014, the UNEP Inquiry on the Design of a Sustainable Financial System asked the Institute for Human Rights and Business (IHRB) to co-produce a paper on the relationship between a sustainable financial system and human rights (the Paper). This Paper is intended to inform the work of the Inquiry generally by: (i) observing the state of play with respect to consideration of human rights by key actors in the global financial system||(ii) exploring the deeper linkages between finance and human rights in some areas of the financial system that have not been explored||(iii) making policy recommendations where possible||and (iv) pointing to areas for future research. The Paper aims to inform the “inclusive” side of the “green and inclusive” discourse, and contribute toward the policy and regulatory recommendations made by the Inquiry in its October 2015 Global Report.


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2016