Book/Report
On the Role of Central Banks in Enhancing Green Finance - Inquiry Working Paper 17/01
United Nations Environment Programme

This paper examines the role of central banks in ‘greening’ financial systems. Given the enormous investments needed to bring about a green transformation, the financial sector will have to play a central role in allocating resources towards a sustainable and green economy – and stop financing activities that harm the environment. Against this backdrop, the paper examines the extent to which environmental factors impinge on central banks’ conventional goals and provides a theoretical analysis of the cases for and against central banks to respond to environmental and sustainability challenges.


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Toolkit, Training document
Eco-i Manual - Chemicals Supplement
United Nations Environment Programme

The sector specific supplement for chemicals value chains is an integral part of the Eco-I manual, as it applies the eco-innovation methodology with all its phases and activities on the chemicals value chain. Valuable background information, learning case studies as well as tips&tricks give hands on examples and therefore can facilitate the implementation of eco-innovation in the chemicals sector.


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Infographic/Flyer
Sustainable Lifestyles - Infographic
United Nations Environment Programme
Download: English
Atlas
Atlas of Africa Energy Resources
United Nations Environment Programme, African Development Bank

This Atlas compiles and synthesizes regional and national information. It presents the scale and distribution of energy resources, production and
consumption trends, as well as the existing potential for environmentally sustainable expansion. It will stimulate decision makers, planners,
investors, energy experts, businesses and citizens to take actions to achieve sustainable, modern and affordable energy for all in Africa.


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Book chapter
Energy Profile: Algeria
United Nations Environment Programme

The population of Algeria in 2013 was just over 39 million (Table 1). In 2015, total production of electricity in the country was 65,588 ktoe with most (99.3
per cent) produced from fossil fuels. Generation from renewable sources is almost negligible. Final consumption of electricity has been increasing over the years from a low of 18,595 ktoe in 2009 to 54,313 ktoe in 2015


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Book chapter
Energy Profile: Angola
United Nations Environment Programme

In 2013, Angola had a population of just over 21 million with an energy sector dominated by hydropower and oil (IEA, 2016). Electricity production in 2015 was 617 ktoe with 73.2 per cent of it generated from hydro and 24.7 per cent from fossil fuels (AFREC, 2015). Total final consumption (TFC) of electricity has been steadily increasing in recent years, rising from 132 ktoe in 2009 to 535 ktoe in 2015. In 2015, industry used 27.4 per cent of total electricity consumption (AFREC, 2015).


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Book chapter
Energy Profile: Botswana
United Nations Environment Programme

According to the African Energy Commission (AFREC, 2015), total electricity produced in 2015 was 278 ktoe with 99.6 per cent of it produced from fossil fuels. Industry consumed 25.1 per cent of all electricity consumed in 2015. Botswana’s energy capacity is thermal, produced mostly in coal-fired plants with a few small diesel generators in rural areas. The 132 MW Morupule coal-fired station generates most of the domestic electricity supply. More than 50 per cent of Botswana’s power requirements are imported from South Africa and Zambia.


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Book chapter
Energy Profile: Cape Verde
United Nations Environment Programme

Cape Verde had a popuplation of just over half a million people in 2013 (World Bank, 2015). Total electricity produced in 2015 was 31 ktoe, 87 per cent of which was generated from fossil fuels (AFREC, 2015).


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Book/Report
Energy Profile: Chad
United Nations Environment Programme

Although crude oil has become the country’s primary source of export earnings, energy access for the population is very low. Electricity production in 2015 was 28 ktoe with 96.4 per cent of it generated from fossil fuels. Final electricity consumption in 2015 was 20 ktoe (AFREC, 2015).


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Book chapter
Energy Profile: Comoros
United Nations Environment Programme

In 2013, the population of the Comoros was 13.1 million people (World Bank, 2016). Electricity production in 2015 was 6 ktoe, with all of it generated from fossil fuels. Final electricity consumption in the same year was 6 ktoe (AFREC, 2015). Table 2 shows the main energy statistics.


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