Booklets and Brochures
The Environmental Rights Initiative: Join Us
United Nations Environment Programme

A guide on who can join the the UN Environment with the goal to promote environmental rights.


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2018
Booklets and Brochures
Environmental Rights Initiative: Concept Note
United Nations Environment Programme

This concept note sheds light on the goal of the Environmental Rights Initiative, which is to bring environmental protection nearer to the people by assisting state and non-state actors to promote, protect and respect environmental rights.


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2018
Booklets and Brochures
Analysis of International Funding for the Sustainable Management of Coral Reefs and Associated Coastal Ecosystems
United Nations Environment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre

Between 2010 and 2016, more than USD 1.9 billion was committed to implement, monitor and enforce the conservation and sustainable management of tropical coral reefs and associated mangroves and seagrasses, yet coral reef ecosystems alone provide society with living resources and services equating approximately USD 375 billion per year. This analysis explores the intended purpose and spatial and temporal distribution of funding allocations. The alignment of funding with policy ambitions related to coral reefs and associated ecosystems is assessed, along with implications for future investment in the conservation of these ecosystems.


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2018
Booklets and Brochures
Background: The African Elephant Action Plan
United Nations Environment Programme, The African Elephant Fund
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2018
Booklets and Brochures
Libreville Declaration on Health and Environment in Africa - 29 August 2008
United Nations Environment Programme, World Health Organization
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2009
Booklets and Brochures
Invasive Alien Species: A Growing Threat in Regional Seas
United Nations Environment Programme

Invasive species have been identified as one of the four greatest threats to marine and coastal ecosystems, together with land-based sources of marine pollution, overexploitation of living marine resources, and habitat degradation.Apart from their ecological impacts, marine and coastal invasive species also have a range of economic and human health consequences.


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2006
Booklets and Brochures
Welcome to the SAICM Chemicals in Products Programme!
United Nations Environment Programme
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Booklets and Brochures
Overarching Principles and Best Practice Guidelines for Marine Mammal Watching in the Wider Caribbean Region
United Nations Environment Programme, Caribbean Environment Programme

The people of the Wider Caribbean Region (WCR) depend greatly on coastal and marine resources for their economic, social and cultural well-being. One of the region’s major economic activities-tourismis dependent on these resources and, therefore, it is critical that it be developed and carried out in a responsible and sustainable manner. A growing, yet not fully realized component of tourism in the WCR is marine mammal watching.


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Booklets and Brochures
Latin America and the Caribbean : UNEP in the Regions - Environment for Development
United Nations Environment Programme

The main pressures on the environment and natural resources are poverty, increasing income inequality, limited planning, especially in urban areas, and high dependence of many economies on the exploitation of natural resources.


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Booklets and Brochures
Draft Ocean Acidification Paper For Western Indian Ocean Region
Mwachireya, S, Ndagala, J, Moorgawa, S, Ali, H, Randrianandrasana, J, Kimirei, I, Bhoyroo, V

Marine ecosystem management and conservation is facing growing challenges from multiple and cumulative stressors (Chapin et al., 2000). Marine ecosystems are threatened by global climate change pressures of such as increased sea surface temperatures, ocean acidification due to increased dissolution of one-quarter of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) dissolution by world oceans annually (Figure 2) causing measurable declines in ocean pH (increase in H+ ions), carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−]) and saturation state (Le Quéré et al., 2015). This process, referred to as ocean acidification (OA), represents a major threat to marine ecosystems (McClanahan et al., 2011).


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