Factsheets
Environmental Audit of the Sites Impacted by the "Probo Koala" Toxic Waste Dumping in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire - Site 11: Akouédo 1
United Nations Environment Programme

On 19 August 2006, the ship Probo Koala off-loaded 528 cubic meters of liquid wastes in the port of Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. The material was transferred onto tanker trucks operated by a local contractor, and dumped in twelve different locations around the city. In June 2012, UN Environment received a formal request from the Government of Côte d’Ivoire to undertake an independent and scientific environmental audit of the sites that were impacted by the dumping of wastes of the Probo Koala. The Government wished for UN Environment to determine whether the sites continued to pose risks for the environment or for public health, and to make recommendations about additional or corrective clean-up measures that would need to be carried out in case contamination was detected.


Download: English, French
2017
Factsheets
Environmental Audit of the Sites Impacted by the "Probo Koala" Toxic Waste Dumping in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire - Site 9: Alépé 1
United Nations Environment Programme

On 19 August 2006, the ship Probo Koala off-loaded 528 cubic meters of liquid wastes in the port of Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. The material was transferred onto tanker trucks operated by a local contractor, and dumped in twelve different locations around the city. In June 2012, UN Environment received a formal request from the Government of Côte d’Ivoire to undertake an independent and scientific environmental audit of the sites that were impacted by the dumping of wastes of the Probo Koala. The Government wished for UN Environment to determine whether the sites continued to pose risks for the environment or for public health, and to make recommendations about additional or corrective clean-up measures that would need to be carried out in case contamination was detected.


Download: English, French
2017
Factsheets
Environmental Audit of the Sites Impacted by the "Probo Koala" Toxic Waste Dumping in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire - Site 10: Alépé 2
United Nations Environment Programme

On 19 August 2006, the ship Probo Koala off-loaded 528 cubic meters of liquid wastes in the port of Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. The material was transferred onto tanker trucks operated by a local contractor, and dumped in twelve different locations around the city. In June 2012, UN Environment received a formal request from the Government of Côte d’Ivoire to undertake an independent and scientific environmental audit of the sites that were impacted by the dumping of wastes of the Probo Koala. The Government wished for UN Environment to determine whether the sites continued to pose risks for the environment or for public health, and to make recommendations about additional or corrective clean-up measures that would need to be carried out in case contamination was detected.


Download: English, French
2017
Factsheets
Environmental Audit of the Sites Impacted by the "Probo Koala" Toxic Waste Dumping in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire - Site 1: Treichville
United Nations Environment Programme

On 19 August 2006, the ship Probo Koala off-loaded 528 cubic meters of liquid wastes in the port of Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. The material was transferred onto tanker trucks operated by a local contractor, and dumped in twelve different locations around the city. In June 2012, UN Environment received a formal request from the Government of Côte d’Ivoire to undertake an independent and scientific environmental audit of the sites that were impacted by the dumping of wastes of the Probo Koala.
The Government wished for UN Environment to determine whether the sites continued to pose risks for the environment or for public health, and to make recommendations about additional or corrective clean-up measures that would need to be carried out in case contamination was detected.


Download: English, French
2017
Factsheets
Environmental Audit of the Sites Impacted by the "Probo Koala" Toxic Waste Dumping in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire - Site 2: Vridi Canal 1 (Cap Logistics)
United Nations Environment Programme

On 19 August 2006, the ship Probo Koala off-loaded 528 cubic meters of liquid wastes in the port of Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. The material was transferred onto tanker trucks operated by a local contractor, and dumped in twelve different locations around the city. In June 2012, UN Environment received a formal request from the Government of Côte d’Ivoire to undertake an independent and scientific environmental audit of the sites that were impacted by the dumping of wastes of the Probo Koala.
The Government wished for UN Environment to determine whether the sites continued to pose risks for the environment or for public health, and to make recommendations about additional or corrective clean-up measures that would need to be carried out in case contamination was detected.


Download: English, French
2017

Download:
Chapters and Articles
Antimicrobial Resistance: Investigating the Environmental Dimension - Frontiers 2017: Emerging Issues of Environmental Concern
Gaze, William, Depledge, Michael

Antibiotic pharmaceuticals are used around the world to treat and prevent bacterial infections in humans, animals and even plants. They have also been used widely as growth promoters to increase meat production, although this practice was banned in the European Union in 2006. While the misuse of antibiotics in medical and agricultural practices has been linked to increasing resistance, the role of the natural environment in the emergence and spread of resistance has received relatively little attention.


Download: English, Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian, Spanish
2017
Summaries
The Emissions Gap Report 2017 - Executive Summary
United Nations Environment Programme

The eighth UN Environment Emissions Gap Report provides an up-to-date scientific assessment of the global progress towards the emissions reductions required to be on track to meet the long-term goal of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).
The overall conclusion of the assessment is that government and other stakeholder’s emissions reduction commitments are far from the level of ambition required for an emissions pathway consistent with staying below a 2°C, let alone a 1.5°C, temperature increase.


Download: English
2017

Download:

Download: