Policy and Strategy Documents
UNEP and Indigenous Peoples: A Partnership in Caring for the Environment: Policy Guidance: November 2012
United Nations Environment Programme

The objective of this Policy Guidance to UNEP is to better understand and build on the Indigenous Peoples’ rights, knowledge, practices and systems that provide the framework for the harmonious relations that most Indigenous Peoples have with their environment. Furthermore, this Policy Guidance aims to ensure that United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) appropriately considers Indigenous Peoples in its activities, with the understanding that UNEP does not speak in the name of or represent Indigenous Peoples.


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2012
Policy and Strategy Documents
Trade and Environment Briefings: Export Restrictions - Policy Brief 2
United Nations Environment Programme, International Trade Center (ITC), International Center for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD)

Natural resources – in the form of finite resources such as minerals and energy, and renewable natural resources such as agricultural commodities (including biofuels), timber, fish, leather and forest products – are increasingly in demand due to rising wealth and a growing population. Trade is an essential means to secure access to resources, not least as they are unevenly distributed across the globe, and no single country is entirely self-sufficient.


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2012
Summaries
Greening the blue helmets: Environment, Natural Resources and UN Peacekeeping Operations - Executive Summary
United Nations Environment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme

This is the executive summary of the Greening the Blue Helmets report. The report aims to provide a comprehensive overview of how peacekeeping operations affect and are affected by natural resources and environmental conditions. At the same time, the report also highlights the positive efforts that have been undertaken to reduce the environmental impacts of UN peacekeeping operations. This report shows that peacekeeping operations not only have important natural resource implications, as well as significant impacts on the environment, but also that natural resources are often a fundamental aspect of conflict resolution, livelihoods and confidence-building at the local level. The report is divided into two main parts. Part 1 reviews the environmental management of peacekeeping operations and showcases good practices, technologies and behaviours that have already been adopted. Part 2 examines the role that peacekeeping operations have played in stabilizing countries where violent conflicts have been financed by natural resources – including diamonds, gold, timber and oil – or driven by grievances over their ownership, access and control. It has been developed by UNEP in consultation with a number of international experts and nongovernmental organizations.


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2012
Annual Reports
Energy and Water Statistics 2012 - Mauritius

This issue of Economic and Social Indicators presents Statistics on Energy and Water for the years 2011 and 2012. The statistics have been compiled in close collaboration with the Central Electricity Board (CEB), the Central Water Authority (CWA), the petroleum companies, the Independent Power Producers (IPPs) and the Meteorological Services. All data refer to the Republic of Mauritius, unless stated otherwise.


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2012
Annual Reports
Environmental statistics 2012 - Mauritius
Mauritius, Ministry of Finance and Economic Development

This issue of Economic and Social Indicators presents Statistics on Environment for year 2012 based on data gathered from various institutions. The main environment indicators over the ten-year period, 2003 – 2012 are given in Table 1 while technical notes are given at Annex.


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2012
Reports and Books
Policy implications of warming permafrost
United Nations Environment Programme

This report describes the current and potential future status of permafrost and makes policy recommendations to address the impacts of permafrost degradation in a warming climate. Climate projections in the fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) do not account for carbon dioxide and methane emissions from thawing permafrost. The report recommends commissioning a special report on permafrost emissions from the IPCC, creating national permafrost monitoring networks and developing national adaptation plans for future permafrost degradation.


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2012
Reports and Books
Land health surveillance: an evidence-based approach to land ecosystem management in the West Africa Sahel
United Nations Environment Programme

This report presents the concepts of land health surveillance a science based approach to land health assessment and monitoring. The approach is modelled on evidence-based approaches used in the public health sector, where surveillance is the main mechanism for determining public health policy and practice. The approach is operationalized using latest advances in earth observation from space, in the field, and on the laboratory bench, combined with geographic information systems and hierarchical statistical methods.


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2012
Reports and Books
Climate Change: The IPCC 1990 and 1992 Assessments
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

With the formation of the World Climate Programme after the 1979 World Climate Conference, the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environment Programme - together with the International Council of Scientific Unions - signalled their determination to pursue climate and climate change studies. Their joint efforts reached a decision stage at the International Conference on the Assessment of the Role of Carbon Dioxide and of Other Greenhouse Gases in Climate Variations and Associated Impacts (Villach, Austria, 1985)||the findings of the Conference and subsequent meetings on the subject laid the foundation for the current international activities on global wanning. A major contributor to the activities is the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), jointly established by our two organizations in 1988 under the Chairmanship of Professor Bert Bolin. The Panel formed three Working Groups (a) to assess available scientific information on climate change (Working Group I), (b) to assess environmental and socio-economic impacts of climate change (Working Group II), and (c) to formulate response strategies (Working Group III) and a Special Committee on the Participation of Developing Countries to promote the participation of those countries in its activities. The IPCC First Assessment Report was completed in August 1990 and consists of: the Overview, the IPCC Scientific Assessment, the IPCC Impacts Assessment, the IPCC Response Strategies (the last three including the respective Policymaker Summaries) and the Policymaker Summary of the IPCC Special Committee. The Report has now become a standard-work of reference, widely used by policymakers, scientists and other experts and represents a remarkable co-ordinated effort by hundreds of specialists from all over the world. Anticipating a continuing need for the most current information on climate change in the context of the ongoing negotiations on the Framework Convention on Climate Change and the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (Rio de Janeiro, June 1992), and as mandated by the governing bodies of our two organizations, the IPCC requested its three Working Groups in March 1991 to produce updates of their 1990 reports. The result is the 1992 IPCC Supplement which was completed in February 1992. This volume contains the Supplement and the 1990 Overview and Policymaker Summaries.


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2012
Reports and Books
Global International Waters Assessment: Canary Current, GIWA Regional Assessment 41
University of Kalmar on behalf of United Nations Environment Programme

This report presents the GIWA assessment of the Canary Current region, which covers the Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem and the river systems draining into it. The region has several drainage systems of both national and international significance and are exploited for crop and livestock development, rural as well as urban domestic water needs and industrial development. The environmental impacts of stream flow modification and changes in the water table have led to serious socio-economic impacts that often have significant transboundary implications. Overexploitation of living resources in the marine waters is another major issue in the region and most of the coastal countries in the region have already taken steps in terms of regulating fisheries at national and international level. The root causes of freshwater shortage in the Senegal River and Souss-Massa River basins as well as for the overexploitation issues in the marine part of the region are identified and potential remedial policy options are presented.


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2012
Reports and Books
Climate Change 1992: The Supplementary Report to the IPCC Impacts Assessment
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

March 1991. These tasks were: prediction of the regional distributions of climate change and associated impacts studies, including model validation studies||energy and industry related issues||agriculture and forestry-related issues||vulnerability to sea-level rise. From the stimulus provided by the publication in 1990 of the IPCC Impacts Assessment, many regional studies have been carried out on assessment of impacts of climate change. A questioimaire circulated by Working Group II in June 1991 was valuable in revealing new information and in defining areas of common concern to many countries (see Appendix A). Thus, roughly 50% of the responses highlighted the impacts of climate change on hydrology and water resources, emphasising the importance of water in most countries. Other topics of priority interest, particularly for developing countries, were agriculture and forestry, and the world's oceans and coastal zones. Both reflect the apprehension of countries over availability of food supplies from land and sea sources.


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2012