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Reports and Books
Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Marine Biodiversity
United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre (United Nations Environment Programme-WCMC)

UNEP-WCMC has provided technical support to the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) to conduct a major study of more than 300 scientific literatures to synthesise the observed and predicted impacts of ocean acidification on marine biodiversity. The study, Scientific Synthesis of the Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Marine Biodiversity, describes an alarming picture of possible ecological scenarios and adverse impacts of ocean acidification for marine ecosystems, and highlights the direct link between climate change, ocean health and human well-being. The study was released by the CBD on the 14th December 2009 to mark Oceans Day and inform the climate change negotiations in Copenhagen.


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2010
Reports and Books
A practical guide to landfill management in Pacific Island countries and territories: Volume 1 - Inland-based waste disposal (2nd edition)
Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP)

Solid waste management is an environmental priority for most islands in the Pacific. Unfortunately, lack of recycling and reduction initiatives, poor waste collection systems, open dumpsites, and environmental pollution are still common in many countries in the region. Despite this general outlook, there are a number of positive changes being made to improve waste management policies and practices in Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs), including improvement of collection systems, implementation of container deposit schemes, and the upgrading and construction of sanitary landfills. This book is primarily targeted at solid waste officers in Pacific island countries and territories (PICTs) who may have little background in engineering and construction. The objective of this guide is to help those users understand the concept of a landfill and its operation.


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2010
Reports and Books
Waste and Climate Change - Global Trends and Strategy Framework
United Nations Environment Programme

The sound management of waste can have substantial co-benefits for efforts to address climate change. As a first step to realize these co-benefits, this report seeks - To examine the potential of climate impacts and benefits of different waste management activities. - To present a UNEP-led framework strategy to assist countries in prioritizing their resources and efforts for waste management and climate change mitigation. The framework strategy is intended to align with the internationally recognized waste management hierarchy, in which waste prevention receives the highest priority, to optimize the co-benefits for climate change mitigation. The Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has directed its International Environmental Technology Centre (IETC) branch to take action in the area of waste management.


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2010
Reports and Books
Deep-sea sponge grounds Seas
United Nations Environment Programme

This report draws together scientific understanding of deep-water sponge grounds alongside the threats they face and ways in which they can be conserved. Beginning with a summary of research approaches, sponge biology and biodiversity, the report also gives up-to-date case studies of particular deep-water sponge habitats from around the world. These include the spectacular giant glass sponge reefs of British Columbia – a relic of the time of the dinosaurs – and the diverse sponge kingdom of Antarctica. Long overlooked, recent research now shows that deep-water sponge grounds form complex, slow-growing and long-lived habitats in many parts of the global ocean. As well as forming local biodiversity centres, deep-water sponges are also storehouses of novel chemical compounds, some of which show promise in the fight against cancer and other diseases. Despite their inherent and biotechnological value, deep-water sponge grounds have been damaged by bottom fishing. This report considers the international policy context in which deep-water sponge grounds can be conserved and concludes with a series of expert recommendations for conservation managers and international policy makers. The recommendations set out a series of actions so that these vulnerable marine ecosystems can be conserved for future generations


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2010
Reports and Books
Environmental effects of ozone depletion and its interactions with climate change: 2010 Assessment
United Nations Environment Programme

This quadrennial Assessment was prepared by the Environmental Effects Assessment Panel (EEAP) for the Parties to the Montreal Protocol. The Assessment reports on key findings on environment and health since the last full Assessment of 2006, paying attention to the interactions between ozone depletion and climate change. Simultaneous publication of the Assessment in the scientific literature aims to inform the scientific community how their data, modeling and interpretations are playing a role in information dissemination to the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, other policymakers and scientists.


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2010
Serials
Korea Environmental Policy Bulletin - Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR)
Republic of Korea, Ministry of Environment

The Korean government introduced its Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) system in 2000 that strengthened producers responsibility from the production stage up to collection and recycling. EPR system is applied to four packaging materials (paper packaging, glass bottles, metal cans, and plastic packaging), lubricants, tires, fluorescent light bulbs, batteries and electronic products.


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2010
Serials
Tunza vol. 8.1: avatar: reaching the heart
United Nations Environment Programme

UNEPs magazine for youth, about young and by young people


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2010
Reports and Books
Protecting arctic biodiversity: limitations and strengths of environmental agreements
United Nations Environment Programme

The Arctic region is characterized by some of the largest continuous intact ecosystems on the planet, but is facing increasingly larger threats. These threats include the full range of stressors known from other parts of the world, namely habitat loss and fragmentation from infrastructure and industrial development, chemical pollution, overharvesting, climate change and invasive species infestations. Many of these pressures are mainly globally driven, including climate change, long-range transported pollution and even invasive species infestations. Others, such as harvesting and fragmentation are directly under Arctic governance, though often driven from demands outside of the Arctic region.


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2010
Reports and Books
Uzbekistan Environmental Performance Reviews: Second Review
United Nations Economic Commission for Europe

The first Environmental Performance Review (EPR) of Uzbekistan was carried out in 2001. This second review intends to measure the progress made by Uzbekistan in managing its environment since the first EPR, and in addressing upcoming environmental challenges.


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2010