Manuals, Guides and Toolkits
Guidelines for Impact Assessment in the Western Indian Ocean Region
United Nations Environment Programme

The purpose of these guidelines is to:
- Highlight the issues of concern in the WIO region, especially how transboundary impacts on coastal and marine ecosystems could foreclose future livelihood and development options.
- Provide guidance on how transboundary impacts should be assessed, using Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) and Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) tools.
- Advise on how best to develop and/or strengthen legal and administrative instruments in the WIO Region.
This document is primarily intended for people who have to make decisions on environmental issues through the impact assessment process, namely: national, provincial/state and local authorities who comment on impact assessment reports and make decisions about the environment and development. These authorities include, but are not limited to: local authorities, departments or ministries of environment, planning and land use, mines, energy, water, fisheries, agriculture, forestry, housing, roads, tourism, heritage and health.


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2007
Manuals, Guides and Toolkits
Guidelines for Monitoring Marine Litter on the Beaches and Shorelines of the Northwest Pacific Region
United Nations Environment Programme, Northwest Pacific Action Plan
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2007
Policy Brief
Buildings and climate change: status, challenges and opportunities
United Nations Environment Programme

As one of the products of the Sustainable Buildings and Construction Initiative (SBCI), this publication outlines the salient features of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from building use and construction. The target for this study is to assess factors affecting the ability and willingness of the building and construction sector stakeholders to adopt energy efficiency and consequently greenhouse gas emission reduction measures. The objectives of the SBCI are to provide a common platform for all building and construction stakeholders to collectively address sustainability issues of global significance, and to establish globally acknowledged baselines for sustainable buildings and construction practices in particular based on the life cycle approach. The SBCI brings together stakeholders from all phases of buildings life span, such as material manufacturers, architects, real estate developers, construction companies, maintenance and services companies as well as local authorities.


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2007
Reports and Books
History of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment
African Ministerial Conference on the Environment (AMCEN)

Sustainable growth and development of Africa depend on the sustainable use of the continent's natural resources. The increasing degradation of the continent's environment and natural resources made it imperative for African Governments to put in place steps to safeguard these assets, including the adoption of the landmark Lagos Plan of Action in 1980, which proposed concrete measures to address the interface between environment and development of the region. The African Ministerial Conference on the Environment (AMCEN) was established in December 1985, following a conference of African ministers of environment held in Cairo, Egypt in order to promote regional cooperation in addressing environmental issues confronting the region. Being mindful of the link between poverty and the environment, the mandate AMCEN set for itself at its inception was to provide advocacy for environmental protection in Africa||ensure that basic human needs were met adequately and in a sustainable manner||ensure that social and economic development was realized at all levels||and ensure that agricultural activities and practices met the food security needs of the region.


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2007
Reports and Books
Estratégia e Plano de Acção Nacional para o Desenvolvimento das Capacidades na Gestão Ambiental Global em Cabo Verde
Charles Yvon Rocha, Arlinda Duarte Neves

A ligação entre a Gestão Ambiental Global e o Desenvolvimento Durável é capital para um país como Cabo Verde. Os “cenários” de desenvolvimento humano e económico, tendo em conta a vulnerabilidade ambiental e no contexto de um pequeno estado


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2007
Reports and Books
GEO Resource Book: A training manual on integrated environmental assessment and reporting
United Nations Environment Programme

East Asia is comprised of eight countries and territories: People's Republic of China (China),Hong Kong, Japan, Democratic People's Republic (DPR) of Korea, Republic of Korea,Macau, Mongolia and Taiwan, with a combined land area of 11.8 million km2. The region constitutes a large and important part of the eastern Palearctic Realm. In 1996 IUCNpublished A Regional Action Plan for Protected Areas in East Asia (IUCN, 1996). The planincluded, in addition to improving the management and legal framework for protected areas,an objective of reaching 10% protected area national or territorial coverage by 2000. In 1996,the protected area coverage of East Asia stood at 5.7%. The plan noted: "there are gaps in theprotected area coverage in most, if not all, East Asian countries and territories. However,some countries have much further to go than others in putting into place an effective system.Particular examples include Mongolia and North [DPR] Korea". Nine years later, East Asiahas a total protected area coverage of 1 6%. This review attempts to evaluate this considerablyexpanded protected area system to see if the gaps are now filled or whether additional areasare still needed.


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2007
Reports and Books
Crossroads of Life on Earth - Exploring means to meet the 2010 Biodiversity Target
United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre (United Nations Environment Programme-WCMC)

The aim of this assessment study was to explore policy options under current discussion in the global political arena that could have major positive or negative impacts on biodiversity. The central concern of the assessment is the achievement of the 2010 Biodiversity Target at global and regional levels, as agreed upon under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). However, because of the time lag of several measures, the longterm effects with a time horizon of 2050 are also taken into account. The assessment was carried out using models allowing a quantitative approach. Results have been expressed where possible in terms of the 2010 indicators according to the CBD Conference of the Parties (COP) decisions VII/30 and VIII/15. These results were used as input for the second edition of the Global Biodiversity Outlook (GBO-2) to support policy-makers in determining cost-effective ways to achieve the 2010 target.


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2007
Reports and Books
A Regional Overview & Assessment of Marine Litter Related Activities in the Western Indian Ocean Region
United Nations Environment Programme, Western Indian Ocean Marine Science Association (WIOMSA)

The study aims to collate existing information about marine litter in the Region and use it to determine whether or not there is a need to be concerned, and to recommend a way forward.


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2007
Reports and Books
National Environment Policy - Mauritius
Ministry of Environment and NDU

This White Paper defines the new National Environment Policy of the Republic of Mauritius, establishes a clear policy framework and sets appropriate environmental objectives and strategies. It is based on a review of key environmental issues, challenges and opportunities that are specific to our national context and it sets a policy framework under which we have to mainstream environmental considerations in all development programmes and projects. It serves as a guide and a tool for decision-making and action for both environmental management and economic development. The goal of this new environmental policy is therefore two-fold: it has to help in the management of our ecosystems which supports the economic growth of the country and it has to contribute to the improvement of the quality of life of the Mauritian population. This new policy will be implemented mainly through the revised National Environment Strategy and Action Plan detailing strategies and action plans and setting time-frames and targets.


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2007
Serials
Korea Environmental Policy Bulletin - Policies on Conservation of the DMZ District Ecosystem
Republic of Korea, Ministry of Environment

The Korean Peninsula has been divided by the 248km-long Military Demarcation Line (MDL) from East to West across the areas of Ggeutseum Ganghwa-gun, and Myeongho-ri Goseong-gun since the end of the Korean War in 1953. Along this line a 2km-wide Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) was set up on both sides of the line. As a historical relic of national division the DMZ is unique because it allowed the conservation of the natural ecosystem as both North and South Korea have strictly restricted access to the area. Along with the Baekdudaegan Mountain Range and Coastal areas the DMZ is one of the three Core Eco-Networks for the conservation of the national natural environment (See Fig.1). To systematically manage the DMZ District thorough analysis of the ecosystem including the natural environment should come first. In line with this there have been a number of studies beginning in 1965 with an investigation of the ecosystem along the northern part of the Civilian Control Line (CCL) conducted by The International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. However since the studies place disproportionate emphasis on partial aspects of the ecosystem and maintenance plans an effective plan has yet to be introduced. In particular as environmental conservation plans are not embodied development plans and actions are not controlled so the area that needs conservation is not managed properly.


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2007