Tagged on: Resource Efficency

Summaries
Uncovering Pathways towards an Inclusive Green Economy: a Summary for Leaders
United Nations Environment Programme

An Inclusive Green Economy (IGE) is focused on expanding options and choices for national economies, using targeted and appropriate fiscal and social protection policies, and backed up by strong institutions that are specifically geared to safeguarding social and ecological floors. And it recognizes that there are many and diverse pathways to environmental sustainability. This paper speaks to the multiple benefits – economic, health, security, social and environmental – that such an approach can bring to nations, mindful of the differing challenges faced by states along the development continuum, be they developed, developing, emerging, or in conflict. It argues for policies that are nuanced, context-dependent, and modulated. An integrated approach can help states understand how to maximize, prioritize, and sequence the different benefits to human well-being that can be derived from a healthy environment. At the end of the day, an inclusive green economy must provide not only for jobs and income, but for our health, our environment and our future. This is our common challenge: creating the conditions for enhanced prosperity and growing social equity, within the contours of a finite and fragile planet.


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2015
Reports and Books
Responsible Food Purchasing: Four Steps Towards Sustainability for the Hospitality Sector
United Nations Environment Programme

This guidance document will help food purchasers to understand better the importance to their business of responsible food purchasing, while providing practical advice and guidance to enable them to make the right decisions and choices. This guidance outlines an approach to integrating food sustainability into your business, with practical steps, checklists and tips reinforced by case studies that provide valuable learning from those already embarked on responsible food purchasing. The resources listed at the end of the document will enable you to explore the wider sustainability agenda further, as responsible food purchasing remains a rapidly evolving field.


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2015
Reports and Books
Aligning Africa’s Financial System with Sustainable Development: Briefing
United Nations Environment Programme

Adequate, appropriate finance is crucial for Africa’s sustainable development. Its availability depends on African countries developing financial systems that can effectively draw on and deploy to best use domestic and international, private and public sources. With the growing importance, in particular, of both domestic sources of finance, and private investment (both domestic and international), it is critically important that Africa’s financial and capital markets develop in ways that will promote sustainable development on the continent. Aligning a financial system with sustainable development does not happen automatically. The increasing scale and sophistication of Africa’s financial system alone will not achieve it. Indeed, international evidence amply demonstrates that financial and capital markets can — and often do — become detached and fail to adequately serve the long-term needs of inclusive sustainable development.


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2015
Reports and Books
Regional Trends Report on Energy for Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific
United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP)

The Regional Trends Report on Energy for Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific provides perspectives on a range of issues to advance implementation of the Asian and Pacific Energy Forum (APEF) Ministerial Declaration and the Plan of Action. It identifies key challenges and presents selected case studies, offering these as a basis for further regional energy cooperation initiatives.


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2015
Reports and Books
Climate Commitments of Subnational Actors and Business: A Quantitative Assessment of their Emission Reduction Impact
United Nations Environment Programme

Initiatives which catalyse climate action are now recognised increasingly as playing an important role in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) and bridging the global emissions gap. The number and range of these initiatives is growing rapidly. There are several open questions about these initiatives at a global scale, including what contribution they can make to closing the emissions gap, but also what makes a successful initiative and how can this be replicated and scaled up. This paper focuses on the first of these questions.


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2015
Event Document
Aligning the Financial System with Sustainable Development: Pathways to Scale
United Nations Environment Programme

Pathways to Scale, the Inquiry`s third progress report, explores how innovative ideas and practices can be made more effective, adopted more widely, and taken to scale—and as a result move the trillions that are required. Scaling-up proven but limited innovations, is a common development challenge, requiring the adept handling of inevitable technical and institutional barriers, and the creation of viable pathways which can overcome outdated but often resilient conventional wisdoms.


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2015
Reports and Books
Design of a Sustainable Financial System: Netherlands input to the UNEP Inquiry
United Nations Environment Programme

In 2014, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) initiated the Inquiry into the Design of a Sustainable Financial System. The Inquiry is intended to accelerate the transition to a green and circular economy by better aligning the financial system through identifying best practices and exploring financial market policy and regulatory innovations. The Inquiry will do this through an advisory council, practitioner dialogue and research. Financial sector experts from several countries have provided inputs to the Inquiry. The Sustainable Finance Lab, sponsored by the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment, the Netherlands Development Finance Company (FMO) and nine other private financial institutions, invited the Inquiry’s co-director Simon Zadek to a meeting on 26 May 2015 with 20 representatives from the Dutch financial sector (see annex for the list) ranging from public policymakers and regulators to the largest banks, asset managers, insurance companies and sustainable frontrunners. A follow-up meeting will take place on 27 November 2015, hosted by Klaas Knot, President of the Dutch Central Bank (DNB). This note summarizes the input provided to the Inquiry, including best practices, financial market policy and regulatory innovations to help bring about the green economy and a sustainable financial sector. It should be noted that the policy recommendations contained in this note were not formally endorsed by all meeting participants or their institutions.


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2015
Annual Reports
Asian Development Outlook 2014: Fiscal Policy for Inclusive Growth
Asian Development Bank

Developing Asia is expected to extend its steady growth. The region's growth is projected to edge up from 6.1% in 2013 to 6.2% in 2014 and 6.4% in 2015. Moderating growth in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) as its economy adjusts to more balanced growth will offset to some extent the stronger demand expected from the industrial countries as their economies recover. Risks to the outlook have eased and are manageable. The monetary policy shift in the United States (US) may invite some volatility ahead in financial markets, albeit mitigated by accommodative monetary policy in Japan and the euro area. The regional growth outlook depends on continued recovery in the major industrial economies and on the PRC managing to contain internal credit growth smoothly. Greater Public Spending Needed to Reduce Inequality Widening income gaps in developing Asia strengthens the case for greater use of fiscal policy to foster equality of opportunity. While the region has benefited from fiscal prudence in the past, demographic and environmental challenges are expected to compete for public resources in the coming years. To boost public spending on equity-enhancing programs such as education and health without undermining fiscal sustainability, the authorities will need to explore a wide range of options for mobilizing revenue and to build equity objectives into their fiscal plans.


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2014
Reports and Books
Decoupling 2: technologies, opportunities and policy options
United Nations Environment Programme

This report was produced by the Decoupling Working Group of the International Resource Panel. It explores technological possibilities and opportunities for both developing and developed countries to accelerate decoupling and reap the environmental and economic benefits of increased resource productivity. It also examines several policy options that have proved to be successful in helping different countries to improve resource productivity in various sectors of their economy, avoiding negative impacts on the environment.


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2014
Reports and Books
Aligning the Financial System with Sustainable Development: An invitation & background briefing
United Nations Environment Programme

Considerable finance is needed to drive the transition to a green, inclusive economy. A “clean trillion” of additional investment is needed annually up to 2030 to enable new infrastructure to be made green. Private capital is needed to finance this transition, complemented by public expenditure, but is currently being channeled into an unsustainable economy. Traded financial capital globally amounts to US$225 trillion, but little of this is being used to power the transition to a green and inclusive economy. Aligning the financial system to enable the long-term health of the real economy may require changes to its architecture, the ‘rules’ governing how it operates. UNEP has established the Inquiry into the Design of a Sustainable Financial System to address this high-potential policy arena. Building on UNEP’s green economy initiative and two decades of work of the UNEP Finance Initiative, the Inquiry is being guided by a high-level Advisory Panel, and involves wide-reaching engagement and research at the national and international levels.


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2014