Tagged on: Ecosystem management

Foresight Briefs
Emerging Sponge Cities - Foresight Brief No. 005 - January 2018
United Nations Environment Programme

As global populations converge steadily into cities (UN, 2017), fast growing cities are suffering with intensi ed hydroclimatic hazards. In China, more cities are facing challenges associated with urban sustainability and urban water issues such as aging/outdated water and wastewater infrastructures, urban ooding and a high frequency of extreme weather (Li et al., 2017; Lv and Zhao, 2013). The emerging concept and construction of “sponge cities” is an effective approach to solving urban rainstorms(Liu et al., 2015; Xia et al., 2017) and seeks to enhance cities capacity on ood prevention.


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2018
Our Planet
The Global Environment Facility: Delivering Solutions for a Sustainable Future - Our Planet September 2017
United Nations Environment Programme

In this issue of Our Planet, government leaders, policymakers and experts explore the work of the Global Environment Facility and how the partnership is working to drive progress on the world’s most pressing environmental challenges.


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2017
Chapters and Articles
Marine Protected Areas: Securing Benefits for Sustainable Development - Frontiers 2017: Emerging Issues of Environmental Concern
Jones, Peter, Murray, Ruth, Vestergaard, Ole

Marine protected areas offer one of the best options for maintaining or returning ocean and coastal ecosystems to healthy conditions, particularly when developed as part of a wider management system. Ecological benefits come from protecting species, habitats and ecosystem functions. Social benefits come from engaging stakeholders in the planning and the fair sharing of benefits. Economic benefits come from ensuring the long-term sustainable use of natural resources and tourism incomes. The combined impact could support many of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including reducing poverty, improving food security and tackling impacts of climate change.


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2017
Chapters and Articles
Sand and Dust Storms: Subduing a Global Phenomenon - Frontiers 2017: Emerging Issues of Environmental Concern
Shepherd, Gemma

Sand and dust storms are inter-connected with a range of environmental and development issues that extend across national, regional, and continental bounds. Anthropogenic climate change will further exacerbate decades of unsustainable land and water resource management in regions that generate sand and dust storms. This threat can be diminished by quick and effective action.


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2017
Chapters and Articles
Environmental Displacement: Human mobility in the Anthropocene - Frontiers 2017: Emerging Issues of Environmental Concern
Brown, Oli

The interlacing trends of climate change, population growth, rising consumption, large infrastructure projects and environmental degradation may lead to greater numbers of people displaced in future. This is particularly likely if these trends occur in the context of inadequate responses from governments and the international community to build the resilience of countries and communities to these changes. The most commonly cited figure is that there could be as many as 200 million people displaced for environmental reasons by 2050.


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2017
Foresight Briefs
Saving Lake Faguibine - Foresight Brief No. 001 - August 2017
United Nations Environment Programme

The Faguibine system, located in the Tombouktou region in Mali is a series of five interlinked lakes (Télé, Takara, Gouber, Kamango and Faguibine). In the late 19th century the floodplain extended over an area of 1,000 km–, however declining rainfall led to it shrinking to about 90 km² by 2010 (Hamerlynck, et al. 2016). Prolonged droughts over the years also led to the lake completely drying up in 1914, 1924 and 1944 (Pérez, Fernández and Gatti 2010). The decline of the Faguibine is an important issue because of its impacts on livelihood’s, food security and the resulting collapse of the natural ecosystem.


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2017
Foresight Briefs, Serials
Lake Urmia: Signs of Recovery - Foresight Brief No. 004 - November 2017
United Nations Environment Programme

Lake Urmia, located in a mountainous region between the provinces of East and West Azerbaijan in northwestern Iran is one of the country’s most important ecosystems. Recent indications are that the lake is recovering. The focus of this brief is on the extent of this recovery and measures that are being put in place to ensure this is sustained.


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2017
Foresight Briefs
Marine Plastics Litter and Microplastics - Foresight Brief No. 002 - September 2017
United Nations Environment Programme

The global production of plastics has increased from 1.5 million tons in 1950s to about 300 million tons currently, at an average rate of 4 per cent per annum and is expected to continue growing (Boucher and Friot 2017). About 50 per cent of the plastics produced is for single use, and the literature estimates that 8 million tons (2.5 per cent) of the plastic produced are leaked into the oceans annually (PlasticsEurope 2016).


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2017
Foresight Briefs
The Changing Aral Sea - Foresight Brief No. 003 - October 2017
United Nations Environment Programme

The Aral Sea was once the world’s fourth largest inland lake. Its hydrological balance is strongly determined by inflows from the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers which are fed by glacial melt waters from the southwestern Pamir Mountains in Tajikistan and the Tien Shan Mountains that border Kyrgyzstan and China. Research indicated the Aral Sea would eventually split into two by 2030. However, re-engineering along the Syr Darya River delta in the Small Aral Sea has shown the possibilities of deliberate intervention.


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2017
Policy and Strategy Documents
Freshwater Strategy 2017-2021
United Nations Environment Programme

This document describes UN Environment’s five-year Freshwater Strategy from 2017 to 2021. As a living document, it is intended to guide work related to freshwater across UN Environment’s divisions, sub-programmes and regional offices, as well as interactions with governments and partners at national, regional and global levels. The Freshwater Strategy supports the implementation of UN Environment’s Medium-Term Strategy and Programme of Work adopted by universal United Nations (UN) membership through the UN Environment Assembly. Coming at a critical time for freshwater in general, and the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in particular, this strategy aims to unlock the potential of integrated collaboration and spur leadership on freshwater issues globally.


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2017