Tagged on: Disasters and Conflicts

Reports and Books
Maasai Mau forest status report 2005
Ewaso Ngiro South Development Authority, The Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya Forests Working Group, United Nations Environment Programme

The Maasai Mau forest forms the southern part of the Mau Forest Complex, Kenya largest closed-canopy forest area. It is a trust land indigenous forest managed by the County Council of Narok covering some 46,000 hectares. Despite its high catchment value and its potential to become a twin conservation area with the Maasai Mara National Reserve, The Maasai Mau forest is one of the most threatened forest blocks in the Mau Complex, in particular due to irregular allocations of forest land. The report looks at the changes in the forest cover over the past 30 years, presents detailed account on the extent, type and location of recent destructive activities and analyses the irregular processes that enable the illegal allocations of over 14,000 hectares of that forest for settlement.


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2005
GEO
Caribbean Environment Outlook: special edition for the International Meeting for the 10-year Review of the Barbados Programme of Action
United Nations Environment Programme

The Caribbean Environment Outlook assesses the state of the environment in the Caribbean SIDS and Low-Lying Coastal States in terms of the environmental concerns identified in the BPOA and the driving forces of the environmental change.


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2005
Reports and Books
Good practice in emergency preparedness and response
United Nations Environment Programme

This publication acts as a companion to UNEP's APELL for Mining (2001). That document was prepared to assist mining companies to apply UNEP's APELL process, which had previously largely been used in the chemicals industry. In 2003, ICMM considered that it was necessary to take the APELL process further by analysing emergency preparedness and response capabilities within both its corporate and association membership. With UNEP's guidance and input, we questioned members on their performance and systems in this critical area. Our analysis showed that, while ICMM members technical preparations for emergencies are good, more effort is required in working with neighbouring communities.


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2005
Reports and Books
Report of the International Meeting to Review the Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States Port Louis, Mauritius 10-14 January 2005
United Nations (UN)

Report of the International Meeting to Review the Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States


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2005
Our Planet
Our Planet: the rule of law and the Millennium Development Goals
United Nations Environment Programme

The United Nations Environment Programme's flagship magazine.


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2005
Reports and Books
Sourcebook on the Integration of Natural Hazards into the Environmental Impact Assessment Process
Disaster Mitigation Facility for the Caribbean (DMFC), Adaptation to Climate Change in the Caribbean (ACCC) Project

The purpose of this document is to enable the development review process in particular environmental impact assessments (EIA) - to better encourage and promote development design that limits or reduces vulnerability to natural hazards.


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2005
Reports and Books
Maldives post-tsunami environmental assessment
United Nations Environment Programme

In the immediate aftermath of the enormous devastation and suffering caused by the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, UNEP established the Asian Tsunami Disaster Task Force. At the request of the governments of affected countries, the Task Force has assessed tsunami-related environmental damage, worked to ensure that environment is a part of national recovery agendas, and mobilised environmental recovery assistance. This report elaborates the findings of the rapid assessment in the Republic of Maldives, based on a detailed expert investigation of the tsunami's environmental impacts.


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2005
Reports and Books
Sri Lanka post-tsunami environmental assessment
United Nations Environment Programme

The Tsunami disaster of the 26th December 2004 was the worst natural calamity to have befallen Sri Lanka since historical times. It caused the loss of tens of thousands of lives, property and livelihood damage costing many millions of rupees as well as severe damage to the natural and built environment in most of the country's coastal zone.


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2005
Reports and Books
Rapid Environmental Assessment Republic of Maldives
Joint United Nations Environment Programme/ The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) Environment Unit

On 26 December 2004, an earthquake measuring 9.0 on the Richter scale caused powerful tsunamis that reached the Maldives around 9:30 in the morning. A United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination (UNDAC) team was deployed on 27 December in the Maldives, to carry out rapid assessment of priority needs and to support national authorities and the United Nations Resident Coordinator to coordinate international relief on-site. Upon request of the Ministry of Environment and Construction (MEC), a rapid environmental assessment of the impacts of the tsunami on the Republic of Maldives was undertaken by the UNDAC environmental team member. Assessment missions were carried out, together with humanitarian missions, to identify any life threatening environmental emergencies as a result of the tsunami. The main findings of the assessment include: - There are no major life threatening environmental emergencies as a result of the tsunami that struck the Maldives on 26 December 2004||- Areas of major environmental and human health concern have been identified and include emergency waste management and an oil spill on Thilafushi Island||- Severe damage to vegetation and crops, pollution of groundwater and the potential damage to the coral reefs system are of serious concern and the medium and longer-term impacts of the environment should be fully assessed. The negative environmental impacts of the tsunami exacerbated the plight of an already fragile environment, which suffered from years of neglect.


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2005
Reports and Books
Mainstreaming gender in environmental assessment and early warning
United Nations Environment Programme

Gender mainstreaming is best understood as a continuous process of infusing both the institutional culture and the programmatic and analytical efforts of agencies with gendered perspectives. Gender mainstreaming means taking gender seriously and taking it into account in all aspects of the workplace and the work products of the institution.


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2005