Tagged on: Disasters and Conflicts

GEO
GEO Latin America and the Caribbean Environment Outlook 2000
United Nations Environment Programme

An Environment Outlook for the Latin America and the Caribbean region.


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2010
Reports and Books
Haiti Earthquake PDNA: Assessment of damage, losses, general and sectoral needs
Government of the Republic of Haiti

The earthquake on January 12, 2010 has caused an unprecedented situation in Haiti with enormous repercussions affecting all sectors of society, well beyond the areas directly affected by the catastrophe. Over 200,000 lives were lost. Hundreds of thousands of Haitians have been left homeless and have fled the affected area to find refuge in the provinces, adding to an economic situation which was already difficult in these regions. In order to respond to a catastrophe of this scale, this assessment has been designed to go further than traditional post-disaster assessments. The objective has been to lay the foundations for a fresh start in the country's development efforts, as well as to reconstruct the damaged areas and contribute to a long-term national strategic development plan, in order to begin rebuilding Haiti. In addition to the damage and loss assessment which usually constitutes the central part of this type of assessment, an analysis of short-term rehabilitation needs and an analysis of the needs to rebuild the country have led to costed assessments for eight essential themed sectors: governance, the environment, disaster risk management, social sectors, infrastructure-related sectors, the production sector, a macroeconomic analysis, and cross-cutting sectors (youth, gender, vulnerable persons, employment).


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2010
Reports and Books
Sierra Leone Environment, Conflict and Peace-building Assessment
United Nations Environment Programme

The Sierra Leone Environment, Conflict and Peacebuilding Assessment examines how environmental governance and natural resource management will play a vital role in undertaking Sierra Leone's Agenda for Change. Given the role that natural resources played in the civil war, and the remaining environmental impacts of the conflict, addressing these issues in the ongoing peacebuilding process is an important challenge. The assessment examines direct and indirect environmental impacts of the conflict, natural resources-related risks to the peace process, and opportunities to use environmental cooperation for peacebuilding


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2010
Reports and Books
UNEP in China: building back better||UNEP 在中国: 重 建 更 好
United Nations Environment Programme

As the United Nations system's designated entity for addressing environmental issues at the global level, the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) was requested by the Government of the People's Republic of China to lend assistance in the aftermath of the disaster. UNEP immediately engaged in the post-disaster recovery effort, including by coordinating the environmental response to the earthquake through its office in Beijing, which was supported by international experts and technical staff from across the organization. This publication outlines the key achievements of UNEP's engagement in the country from 2008 to 2010, which focused primarily on providing high-level expertise and capacity development for the management of the environmental impacts of the disaster.


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2010
Reports and Books
Women and natural resources in Afghanistan
United Nations Environment Programme

Afghanistan’s women contribute enormously to the management of the country’s natural resources, and therefore to sustaining both rural and urban livelihoods. They fulfill several roles, from providing agricultural labour, cultivating fruit and rearing livestock, to collecting wood and maintaining the family unit through cooking, cleaning and child care.


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2009
Yearbooks and Frontiers
UNEP Year Book 2009
United Nations Environment Programme

The UNEP Year Book 2009 presents work in progress on scientific understanding of global environmental change, as well as foresight about possible issues on the horizon. The aim is to raise awareness of the interlinkages among environmental issues that can accelerate the rates of change and threaten human wellbeing.


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2009
Reports and Books
From conflict to peacebuilding: the role of natural resources and the environment
United Nations Environment Programme

Since 1990 at least eighteen violent conflicts have been fuelled by the exploitation of natural resources. In fact, recent research suggests that over the last sixty years at least forty percent of all intrastate conflicts have a link to natural resources. Civil wars such as those in Liberia, Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo have centred on high-value resources like timber, diamonds, gold, minerals and oil. Other conflicts, including those in Darfur and the Middle East, have involved control of scarce resources such as fertile land and water.


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2009
Reports and Books
UNEP in Afghanistan: laying the foundations for sustainable development
United Nations Environment Programme

The report addresses urban environmental issues such as waste management, sanitation, and air quality||the status and management of natural resources such as woodlands and forests, water, rangelands and wildlife||protected areas conservation||and environmental governance.


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2009
Reports and Books
Natural allies: engaging civil society in UNEP's work
United Nations Environment Programme

This report provides a clear picture of how civil society can and does work with UNEP, both benefiting from and strengthening UNEPs programme of work. The report contributes to assisting civil society catalyse the political and social changes needed if we are to accelerate a transition to a resource efficient, low carbon, sustainable Green Economy in the 21st century.


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2009
Reports and Books
Protecting the environment during armed conflict: an inventory and analysis of international law
United Nations Environment Programme

Findings from these assessments shows that the exploitation and illegal trade of natural resources frequently fuel and prolong armed conflict, particularly in countries where laws and institutions have been weakened or have collapsed. As peacebuilding often addresses the allocation, access and ownership of natural resources, there is an urgent need to strengthen their protection during armed conflict. There can be no durable peace if the natural resources that sustain livelihoods are damaged, degraded, and destroyed. The existing international legal framework contains many provisions that either directly or indirectly protect the environment and govern the use of natural resources during armed conflict.


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2009