Tagged on: Disasters and Conflicts

Reports and Books
Taking root: the cash crop trade in Darfur
United Nations Environment Programme

The purpose of the study is to understand the impact of a decade of conflict in Darfur on the trade in some of Darfur’s major cash crops. How has the cash crop trade adapted, and to what extent, if at all, has it recovered? What are the major constraints faced? The ultimate objective is to identify how the cash crop trade can be supported to better sustain livelihoods in Darfur, and to support the eventual recovery of Darfur’s economy. The study covers groundnuts, Darfur’s most important cash crop, as well as sesame, gum arabic, tombac (chewing tobacco), and oranges. The main focus is trade and agro-processing, although the study also explores trends in production during the last decade.


Download: English, Arabic
2014
Reports and Books
Keeping Track of Our Changing Environment in Asia and the Pacific
United Nations Environment Programme

The Keeping Track of Our Changing Environment in Asia and the Pacific report is a unique scientific and indicator-based assessment report produced by UNEP, with contributions from experts and UNEP National Focal Points from the region. The report analyzes emerging and persistent development and environmental challenges in the region. The report also traces the patterns of economic development and resource use and degradation since 1992 when leaders from countries around the globe made their commitment to sustainable development at the UN Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.


Download: English
2014
Annual Reports
UNEP 2013 Annual Report
United Nations Environment Programme

The 2013 Annual Report lays out the highlights of UNEP's work in 2013, a year in which the organization's Governing Council met under Universal Membership for the first time and the strengthening process agreed the previous year began in earnest. The report focuses on UNEP's achievement in the key focus areas of Climate Change||Disasters and Conflicts||Ecosystem Management||Environmental Governance||Harmful Substances and Hazardous Waste||Resource Efficiency||and Sustainable Consumption and Production. It also highlights the key role UNEP plays in providing environmental leadership to the UN system and the international community: for example, in 2013, nations adopted the Minamata Convention on Mercury, the first new global multilateral environmental agreement in almost a decade.


Download: English, Chinese, French, Spanish, Russian, Arabic
2014
Reports and Books
Livelihood security: Climate Change, Conflict and Migration in the Sahel
United Nations Environment Programme

The Sahelian countries (CILSS) are among the poorest countries in the world with the most degraded environments. They are also among the countries that are the most vulnerable to the estimated effects of climate change. This makes the region an area to focus regional and international attention on, in respect to the possible effects of climate change and its potential linkages to migration and/or conflict. This study focuses on the nine countries that form the Permanent Inter-State Committee for Drought Control in the Sahel namely, Senegal, Guinea Bissau, Cape Verde, Mauritania, Mali, Chad, Niger, Gambia and Burkina Faso.


Download: English
2011
Report
Depleted uranium in Kosovo: post-conflict environmental assessment
United Nations Environment Programme, UNCHS

Post-Conflict Environmental Assessment.


Download: English
2001
Reports and Books
Post-conflict environmental assessment: Albania
United Nations Environment Programme

Post-Conflict Environmental Assessment in Albania.


Download: English
2001
Annual Reports
UNEP - WCMC annual report 2001
United Nations Environment Programme

Biodiversity is the defining characteristic of planet Earth. But our understanding of living things, their role in ecological processes and, most importantly, their significance to our own future, remains poor. What we do now know is that human beings dominate all other species. We divert more than one third of the sun's life-giving power to feed ourselves and our livestock, we have transformed around one third of land to agriculture, and we capture probably more than half the fish production of the oceans and seas every year. The Centre's role is to establish and communicate the impact this dominance has on other life forms, and to evaluate this in terms of its sustainability. Turning complex data into policy-relevant information is one of the tasks that the Centre does best. The World Atlas of Coral Reefs and our input to the Biodiversity Convention's Global Biodiversity Outlook are good examples of successes in 2001. In the coming year we will, amongst other projects, develop further assessments on the world's mountains, seagrass beds and great apes.


Download: English
2001