Tagged on: Climate change

Organogram
UN Environment Organigramme - January 2017
United Nations Environment Programme
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2017
Article
World Must Urgently Up Action to Cut a Further 25% from Predicted 2030 Emissions, Says UN Environment Report - Press Release
United Nations Environment Programme

The world must urgently and dramatically increase its ambition to cut roughly a further quarter off predicted 2030 global greenhouse emissions and have any chance of minimizing dangerous climate change, UN Environment said today as it released its annual Emissions Gap report.


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2016
Toolkit
A toolkit for preparation of low carbon mobility plan
United Nations Environment Programme

The Toolkit for Comprehensive Mobility Plan (CMP) Revised (2014) is used as a starting point for the present toolkit. This toolkit for LCMP caters to a global audience, and provides a simplified approach for LCMP preparation for smaller cities, or cities in which no major investments are envisaged in the short-term. The toolkit has a specific focus on cities in less-developed and developing countries where significant infrastructure will be built to cater to a growing transportation demand and, therefore, land-use and transport policies can play an important role in shaping mobility demand and mode choice.


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2016
Monograph
The state of sustainable finance in the United States
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

While US financial institutions have at times enjoyed a reputation of being something of a laggard on sustainability issues versus their European counterparts, significant changes and innovations are under way which are beginning to drive meaningful change. Record levels of awareness on sustainability issues in the US, including from millennials, are accelerating activities such as: - Increased levels of sustainable and responsible investing. - An increased focus from the largest US banks and other financial institutions on sustainability risks, lending practices and related opportunities. - US insurance companies and related regulators are also developing and evolving sustainability risk frameworks. - Federal and State policies are accelerating the ongoing US low carbon energy transition. - Financial innovation is driving meaningful change in many investment sectors while social innovation and culture development also continue to evolve. With energy costs curves seen as changing for the long term, levelling the playing field for lower carbon energy production, and interest in having a positive impact with investment dollars from millennials on the rise, a top-down, bottom-up race is under way which has created an important new dynamic leading to these actions. Accelerating these trends further can help make the US a leader on both designing and enabling sustainable financial systems.


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2016
Monograph
Human rights and sustainable finance: exploring the relationship
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

In November 2014, the UNEP Inquiry on the Design of a Sustainable Financial System asked the Institute for Human Rights and Business (IHRB) to co-produce a paper on the relationship between a sustainable financial system and human rights (the Paper). This Paper is intended to inform the work of the Inquiry generally by: (i) observing the state of play with respect to consideration of human rights by key actors in the global financial system||(ii) exploring the deeper linkages between finance and human rights in some areas of the financial system that have not been explored||(iii) making policy recommendations where possible||and (iv) pointing to areas for future research. The Paper aims to inform the “inclusive” side of the “green and inclusive” discourse, and contribute toward the policy and regulatory recommendations made by the Inquiry in its October 2015 Global Report.


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2016
Monograph
The First Global Integrated Marine Assessment: World Ocean Assessment I
United Nations

The first World Ocean Assessment provides an important scientific basis for the consideration of ocean issues by Governments, intergovernmental processes, and all policy-makers and others involved in ocean affairs. The Assessment reinforces the science-policy interface and establishes the basis for future assessments. Together with future assessments and related initiatives, it will help in the implementation of the recently adopted 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, particularly its ocean-related goals.


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2016
Infographics
CleanSeas: Marine litter
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

Infographic highlighting the magntitude and the environmental cost of marine litter


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2016
Newsletter
UNEP in Africa newsletter: March - April 2016
United Nations Environment Programme

The Newsletter of UNEP's Regional Office for Africa


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2016
Monograph
Environment, religion and culture in the context of the 2030 agenda for sustainable development
United Nations Environment Programme

Critical action is needed by the international community to address urgent and increasing environmental degradation, and related challenges of social and economic unsustainability. Religion and culture can significantly address climate change, biodiversity and ecosystem loss, pollution, deforestation, desertification and unsustainable land and water use, and other urgent issues identified in a shared vision by all nations in line with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Through integrating environmental dimension of the 2030 Agenda, religious and cultural communities can also promote strong, inclusive, green, sustainable and transformative economies, based on circularity, sharing and collaboration, and alternative measures of growth and wellbeing. They can be instrumental in educating for more sustainable lifestyles and behaviours to achieve sustainable consumption and production, and in considering the impact of their actions on others. They can significantly contribute to ending extreme poverty, leaving no one behind when addressing multi-dimensional poverty and related challenges such as the rights of women, youth and minorities, and access for all to basic services. They can promote innovative nature-based solutions, respect for traditional knowledge and cultural diversity, exercise environmental stewardship and duty of care, build an ethic of global and local citizenship, promote good governance, tolerance, and reconciliation, and build safe, inclusive and peaceful societies. It has become more urgent than ever to promote and disseminate morals, values, behaviours and creative solutions conducive to attaining the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. This universal agenda, and the emerging understanding of the points of religious agreement in environmental ethics, can be the corner stones for a common vision that enhances the role of religion and culture in achieving sustainability. Inter-faith and inter-cultural dialogue can converge on a few insights, among them that of nature as sacred, and the rights of nature, both of which are shared by most organized religions and indigenous peoples, and many natural scientists. Among the many positive actions – large and small – are the 2030 Agenda and SDGs, and the Paris Climate Change. Agreement||the actions of faith based declarations and statements, especially in relation to climate change||the actions of indigenous cultural leaders in support of greater rights and respect of cultural diversity||and the 7 million voices that engaged in vision setting in the run up to the 2030 Agenda and SDGs. These have all come together in a historic year of 2015, and provide tremendous opportunities for building a global partnership for shifting the paradigm and addressing the crucial challenges of our era, both for humanity today as well as for future generations.


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2016
Monograph
Integrated assessment of short-lived climate pollutants in Latin America and the Caribbean: Summary for decision makers
United Nations Environment Programme

In 2011, two scientific global assessments coordinated by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) identified a number of win-win measures for near-term climate change and clean air benefits. Implementation of these cost-effective and readily available measures, which target reducing emissions of short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) in key sectors, can bring rapid and multiple benefits for human well-being and support countries achieve their development objectives, while simultaneously increasing their ambition for climate mitigation in the near term. The reduction in SLCP emissions should, however, be done in parallel with the reduction in carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions.


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2016