Tagged on: Nigeria

Ogoniland poster
United Nations Environment Programme

This is a graphic highlighting the United Nations Environment Programme’s Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland.


Download: Ogonilandposter.pdf, TAI, KHANA, ELEME, GOKANA
2011
Factsheet
Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland: Site Specific Fact Sheets: Buemene-Korokoro
United Nations Environment Programme

Site fact sheet for Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland


Download: English
2011
March 2011 project newsletter
United Nations Environment Programme

This is the March 2011 edition of UNEP in Ogoniland newsletter. This edition has an interview with the Vice Chancellor of Rivers State University of Science and Technology, Professor B. B. Fakae. UNEP in Ogoniland newsletters were issued monthly during the project in Nigeria to give project updates.


Download: UNEP_Ogoniland_newsletter_March2011.pdf
2011
May-June 2011 project newsletter
United Nations Environment Programme

May - June 2011 edition of a monthly newsletter issued during the UNEP's Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland, Nigeria. The newsletter answers basic questions, provides information and gives project updates.


Download: UNEP_Ogoniland_newsletter_May2011_Jun2011.pdf
2011
February 2011 project newsletter
United Nations Environment Programme

This is the February 2011 edition of UNEP in Ogoniland newsletter. This edition pays tribute to Clement Faah, a respected scientist and lecturer, that worked as senior technical assistant on the project's agriculture and forestry component. UNEP in Ogoniland newsletters were issued monthly during the project in Nigeria to give project updates.


Download: February2011_Ogognilandnewsletter.pdf
2011
Reports and Books
Green hills, blue cities: an ecosystems approach to water resources management for African cities
United Nations Environment Programme

Africa is currently the least urbanised region in the world, but this is changing fast. Of the billion people living on the African continent, about 40 per cent lives in urban areas. The urban population in Africa doubled from 205 million in 1990 to 400 million in 2010, and by 2050, it is expected that this would have tripled to 1.23 billion. Of this urban population, 60 per cent is living in slum conditions. In a time of such urban growth, Africa is likely to experience some of the most severe impacts of climate change, particularly when it comes to water and food security. This places huge pressures on the growing urban populations.


Download: English
2011
Chapters and Articles
Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland Chapter 4: Assessment of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater
United Nations Environment Programme

This chapter deals with site-specific land contamination issues where the focus was on soil and groundwater contamination. Sites were assessed on a case-by case basis, where it was often possible to pinpoint the source of the contamination and identify the operator responsible for clean-up.


Download: English
2011
Reports and Books
UN-REDD National Programme Submission Form: Nigeria
Federal Ministry of Environment, Nigeria

The present proposal represents the primary means for Nigeria to access funding in order to embark on REDD+ readiness, doing so in line with negotiations under the UNFCCC, while integrating the federal, state and community levels for REDD+ in an innovative way. The country considers that the UN-REDD partnership, which was designed as a quick-start initiative to support countries to enhance capacities and stakeholder engagement for REDD+, is a suitable platform for their REDD+ readiness ambitions. The Federal Government of Nigeria and the Government of Cross River State are politically committed to develop and realise the REDD+ mechanism in the country, willing to work in synergy, combining their distinctive roles and capacities, employing participatory methods and advancing in close cooperation with the UN-REDD Programme.


Download: English, French, Spanish
2011
Reports and Books
Environmental assessment of Ogoniland
United Nations Environment Programme

A major new independent scientific assessment, carried out by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), shows that pollution from over 50 years of oil operations in the region has penetrated further and deeper than many may have supposed. The assessment has been unprecedented. Over a 14-month period, the UNEP team examined more than 200 locations, surveyed 122 kilometers of pipeline rights of way, reviewed more than 5,000 medical records and engaged over 23,000 people at local community meetings. The environmental restoration of Ogoniland could prove to be the world's most wide-ranging and long term oil clean-up exercise ever undertaken if contaminated drinking water, land, creeks and important ecosystems such as mangroves are to be brought back to full, productive health. The report key findings are alarming both in terms of human health protection and environmental protection.


Download: English
2011
Chapters and Articles
Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland Chapter 2: Background to Environmental Degradation in Ogoniland
United Nations Environment Programme

This section describes in detail Ogoniland’s environmental setting and oil industry operations.


Download: English
2011