Tagged on: Kenya

Reports and Books
City of Nairobi Environment Outlook
United Nations Environment Programme and the United Nations Centre for Human Settlements (UN-HABITAT) and the Government of Kenya

A 'City Development Strategy using a bottom-up approach' to guide the planning of Nairobi is urgently needed to ensure that the Kenyan capital develops on an environmentally-friendly and sustainable path. The central recommendation is made in a landmark draft report issued today. It has been compiled by the Nairobi City Council in collaboration with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the United Nations Centre for Human Settlements (UN-HABITAT). The City of Nairobi Environment Outlook provides the first comprehensive snapshot of the state of Nairobi at the turn of the century. It is also accompanied by a series of wide-ranging recommendations on how to boost the quality of urban life for the Kenyan capital's close to three million residents.


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2009
Reports and Books
Regional Report on River-coast Interactions in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) region
United Nations Environment Programme, the African Centre for Water Research (ACWR), Western Indian Ocean Marine Sciences Association (WIOMSA)

This report presents an assessment of hydrological and land use  characteristics affecting  river‐coast interactions in the West Indian Ocean region. One of the key areas of concern for  the WIO region relates to the interaction between river basins and the coastal and marine  environment.  The report  provides  an  overview  of the  characteristics  of the main rivers  flowing into the South‐West Indian Ocean, from Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique, South Africa  and Madagascar incorporating hydrology, land use and environmental issues. 


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2009
Reports and Books
Guidelines for the Establishment of Environmental Quality Objectives and Targets in the Coastal Zone of the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) Region
United Nations Environment Programme, the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)

This report describes the main ecotones of the WIO region and reviews the pressures on these ecosystems, with emphasis on those arising from land-based activities. The sensitivity of these ecotones and key species which inhibit them is assessed from available literature. This is done with a view to prepare EQO/Ts for the coastal zone of the WIO region.


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2009
Reports and Books
A Regional Overview & Assessment of Marine Litter Related Activities in the Western Indian Ocean Region
United Nations Environment Programme, Western Indian Ocean Marine Science Association (WIOMSA)

The study aims to collate existing information about marine litter in the Region and use it to determine whether or not there is a need to be concerned, and to recommend a way forward.


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2007
Reports and Books
Environment for Development: An Ecosystems Assessment of Lake Victoria Basin Environmental and Socio-Economic Status, Trends and Human Vulnerabilities
United Nations Environment Programme, Pan African START Secretariat (PASS)

In relation to the development of an Environment Outlook Report of the Lake Victoria basin, a stakeholder workshop on Lake Victoria was convened by the Pan African START Secretariat (PASS) in September 2004, through funding from UNEP-DEWA and START through the United States National Science Foundation / US Climate Change Science Program (USNSF/USCCSP). The stakeholder workshop brought together a team of experts from riparian countries of the lake basin region to discuss the issues and scope of the Lake Victoria Basin Environment Outlook Report, including reaching consensus on the structure of the Report, themes to be covered, emerging issues, outlook, experts to write various sections, content of the Report and policy options for action. The expert input was invaluable and sincere appreciation is extended to this group. The Report was collated by the Pan African START Secretariat (PASS) as an input into the Africa Environment Outlook (AEO) 2 and Global Environmental Outlook (GEO) 4 reports produced by UNEP Division of Early Warning and Assessment (DEWA). This publication of technical papers on Lake Victoria, which have been written by some of the experts who were party to the Stakeholders Workshop in 2004, goes hand in hand with the Lake Victoria Environment Outlook Report 2006 as an information resource document. A whole array of issues are covered, including such aspects as: people and livelihoods, health and nutrition, water and land resources, land cover and land use change, freshwater pollution, aquatic biodiversity, energy and environment, natural disasters, fisheries, environmental assets, and legal and institutional frameworks in the lake basin. Each of the papers, while focussing on a particular aspect, tackle the relevant elements of these broad issues to varying degrees, offering, therefore, a richly spiced and integrated perspective of the environmental concerns within the lake basin.


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2006
Reports and Books
Changes in forest cover in Kenya's five water towers 2003 - 2005
Department of Resource Surveys and Remote Sensing (DRSRS), Kenya Forests Working Group (KFWG), Royal Netherlands Embassy

This report is the second volume of a series of biennial assessments of major forest cover changes in Kenya's five main forest areas, namely Mt. Kenya, the Aberdare Range, the Mau Complex, Mt. Elgon and the Cherangani Hills. The first report covered the period 2000-2003. This second report covers the period 2003-2005. Based on satellite imagery (Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper) with a resolution of 30 metres, the analysis of changes enables the detection of major forest cover changes, in particular encroachment. Such analysis, undertaken every two years, aim at providing all concerned stakeholders with an early warning system that will enable them: 1) to identify threatened forest areas in time||and, 2) to prioritize their interventions in these areas to reverse detrimental forest cover changes. The findings are mapped and overlaid with the constituency and district boundaries. Main findings of this report include: In terms of acreage, destruction of indigenous forest increased from 6,032 hectares during the 2000-2003 period to 9,334 hectares in the 2003-2005 monitoring period||All detected destruction of indigenous forests between 2003 and 2005 took place in the Mau Complex , in particular in four forest blocks, namely Maasai Mau forest (trust forest), Eastern Mau Forest Reserve, South West Mau Forest Reserve and Mt. Londiani Forest Reserve||The forests of Mt. Kenya are further improving, with some 2,147 of forests regenerating||There was much cloud cover in the 2003 satellite image, affecting the analysis of change in the Aberdare Range forests between 2000 and 2003. However, the analysis of the satellite images of 2000 and 2005 showed that there were no sites showing significant changes during that five year period||In the Cherangani Hills, there were no sites showing significant changes between 2003 and 2005. The same applies for Mt. Elgon.


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2006
Reports and Books
Lake Victoria Basin Environment Outlook
United Nations Environment Programme

The Lake Victoria Environment Outlook (LVBEO) report provides an in-depth integrated analysis of the environmental dynamics within the basin. The report is the first ecosystem environment outlook report in Africa. It has been produced in partnership with Pan African START Secretariat (PASS) and the University of Nairobi and many scientists in the riparian states. The report has been prepared within the framework of the Africa Environment Outlook (AEO) process


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2006
Reports and Books
Selection, design, and implementation of economic instruments in the solid waste management sector in Kenya: the case of plastic bags
United Nations Environment Programme, Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research & Analysis (KIPPRA), the National Environment Management Authority (NEMA)

This report presents Kenyan government's efforts to reduce the negative environmental impacts associated with the production and disposal of solid waste.


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2005
Reports and Books
Selection, Design, and Implementation of Economic Instruments in the Solid Waste Management Sector in Kenya: The Case of Plastic Bags
United Nations Environment Programme

The generation of solid waste has become an increasing environmental and public health problem everywhere in the world, but particularly in developing countries. The fast expansion of urban, agricultural and industrial activities spurred by rapid population growth has produced vast amounts of solid and liquid wastes that pollute the environment and destroy resources. The management of solid waste is often weak due to lack of appropriate planning, inadequate governance, poor technology, weak enforcement of existing legislation and the absence of economic and fiscal incentives to promote environmentally sound development. The Government of Kenya has currently prioritised solid waste management as a pressing issue and recognizes the value and importance of integrating environmental and development objectives into the decision-making process. The importance of this subsector has been identified in various policy and legislative documents. The use of appropriate economic instruments (EIs) can help to achieve sustainable development by providing the means of internalising environmental degradation and resource depletion costs into the production and consumption process. Economic instruments can work harmoniously with traditional regulatory mechanisms as well as help to provide the necessary funds for supporting sound environmental management initiatives such as recycling and waste disposal facilities.


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2005
Reports and Books
Maasai Mau forest status report 2005
Ewaso Ngiro South Development Authority, The Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya Forests Working Group, United Nations Environment Programme

The Maasai Mau forest forms the southern part of the Mau Forest Complex, Kenya largest closed-canopy forest area. It is a trust land indigenous forest managed by the County Council of Narok covering some 46,000 hectares. Despite its high catchment value and its potential to become a twin conservation area with the Maasai Mara National Reserve, The Maasai Mau forest is one of the most threatened forest blocks in the Mau Complex, in particular due to irregular allocations of forest land. The report looks at the changes in the forest cover over the past 30 years, presents detailed account on the extent, type and location of recent destructive activities and analyses the irregular processes that enable the illegal allocations of over 14,000 hectares of that forest for settlement.


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2005