Tagged on: Indonesia

Reports and Books
Towards a Prosperous Planet: UNEP's Clearing house
United Nations Environment Programme

UNEP's Clearing-house, one of our youngest programmes, expands our roles of 'catalysis and co-ordination" in the field of technical co-operation. The Clearing-house acts as a benevolent broker, an impartial friend and advisor to match the colossal needs of the poor with the significant resources of the more affluent. It has been created to be used as an unprejudiced source of information and advice, and as a facilitator.


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Reports and Books
Climate Crisis: The Societal Impacts Associated with the 1982-83 Worldwide Climate Anomalies
United Nations Environment Programme, United States National Center of Atmospheric Research, Environmental and Societal Impacts Group

Report based on the workshop on the Economic and Societal Impacts Associated with the 1982-83 Worldwide Climate Anomalies, 11-13 November 1985, Lugano, Switzerland, organized and financed by the United Nations Environment Programme and the Environmental and Societal Impacts Group of the National Center for Atmospheric Research.These case studies briefly describe the climate situation that transpired during 1982-83. They then identify some of the societal and environmental impacts of the climate anomalies of the period. The case studies are clearly meant to be illustrative and not exhaustive. They provide a set of baseline studies against which future similar studies might be compared. Most likely, not all of these climate anomalies will prove to have been directly or indirectly related to the occurrence of ENSO events. In addition, the strength of those teleconnections that prove to be valid will have to be defined.


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Reports and Books
A Suggested National Soils Policy for Indonesia
United Nations Environment Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Soils are a basic natural and almost non-renewable resource, the use of which should be governed by two major principles: - soil losses and degradation must be avoided, and, - soils must be used to their maximum potential for human benefits, but within the limits of environmental soundness and of sustainability. Therefore a national soils policy should constitute a set of guidelines that aim to ensure and promote maximum utilization of soils on a sustained basis, without lowering productivity or causing direct or indirect damage to the environment. A national soils policy has four basic aspects, addressing respectively technical, socio-economic, institutional and legal elements. Indonesia covers almost 2 million km 2 , with a wide range of soils, agroclimates and resultant land-use types. About 30% of the total land surface - 60 million ha - is considered suitable for agricultural production, and half of that is already under cultivation.


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Reports and Books
The Present State of Mangrove Ecosystems in Southeast Asia and the Impact of Pollution: Indonesia
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, United Nations Environment Programme

This report is a brief overview over the problems around the utilization and conservation of mangrove forests and the mangrove ecosystems in Indonesia.


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Reports and Books
Global Material Flows and Resource Productivity: Assessment Report for the UNEP International Resource Panel
United Nations Environment Programme, International Resource Panel

This report finds that global material use has tripled over the past four decades, with annual global extraction of materials growing from 22 billion tonnes (1970) to 70 billion tonnes (2010). It also provides a new material footprint indicator, reporting the amount of materials that are required for final consumption, which sheds light on the true impact of economies. By relating global supply chains to final demand for resources, the indicator is a good proxy for the average material standard of living in a country. It indicates that the level of development and well-being in wealthy industrial countries has been achieved largely through highly resource-intensive patterns of consumption and production, which are not sustainable, even less replicable to other parts of the world.


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Reports and Books
Managing Peatlands to Cope with Climate Change: Indonesia’s Experience
Indonesia, Ministry of Environment and Forestry

Considering the significance of Indonesia’s peatlands for the environment as well as for the livelihoods of the communities surrounding the area, Indonesia has prioritized its environmental strategy to restoring degraded peatland, conserving the remaining good peatland and providing alternative livelihood for communities living inside and surrounding peatland. Several measures were taken including issuing policy and regulations reflecting the commitment for better peatland management, developing institutional arrangements to deal with problems in peatland management, conducting research and development to better manage Indonesia’s peatland, and providing incentives for conservation and sustainable management of peatland.


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Reports and Books
Surveillance of Drinking Water Quality in Rural Areas
United Nations Environment Programme, World Health Organization

This book is based on concepts of water supply-related health risk assessment developed by the authors during the course of the Water Decade.These concepts would not have been worth publishing without the practical support provided by several hundred sanitary officers, scientists, engineers, doctors and close colleagues. They have provided the essential information, largely con-tained in pilot project reports, which have confirmed that a systematic approach to surveillance and risk assessment provides the necessary basis on which to improve and maintain the safety of community water supplies.


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Reports and Books
Problems And Prospects Desertification of Desertification Control in the ESCAP Region
United Nations Environment Programme, Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific

Desertification has always been one of the major environmental problems of the developing countries in Asia as well as Australia. To focus world attention on this serious problem, the United Nations Conference on Desertification was convened in 1977 and adopted a Plan of Action to Combat Desertification for promoting and catalysing concerted efforts to counter this disaster. Echoing the recommendations of the Con- ference, the United Nations General Assembly, in its resolution 32/172, requested the regional commissions to support national efforts and co-operate with governments in their plans to combat deser-tification. In response, ESCAP organized a Technical Workshop in October 1981 to consider the steps taken by the Governments of the region to implement the Plan of Action.
After reviewing the problems, progress and prospects in combating desertification, the Workshop felt that the order of priorities of the Plan of Action should be rearranged so as to ensure more efficient use of resources while recommending a series of activities in research, monitoring, training and information for concerted action at the regional level.


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Reports and Books
Lower-GWP Alternatives in Commercial and Transport Refrigeration: An Expanded Compilation of Propane, CO2, Ammonia and HFO Case Studies
United Nations Environment Programme

The present publication comprises an expanded and updated compilation of case studies on lower-GWP energy efficient alternatives and technologies in the commercial refrigeration as well as the transport refrigeration sectors. It provides a number of new commercial refrigeration case studies as well as case studies from the transport refrigeration sector, including alternatives not previously considered in the first volume, to provide better geographical spread and present a more comprehensive overview of lower-GWP alternatives adopted.


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Reports and Books
Smoke on Water: Countering Global Threats from Peatland Loss and Degradation - A Rapid Response Assessment. Revised Edition
United Nations Environment Programme, GRID-Arendal

More than 180 countries have peatlands but we are only just starting to understand their role in both climate change and our efforts to curb it. Peatlands cover less than three percent of the Earth’s surface but are the largest terrestrial organic carbon stock – storing twice as much carbon as in the world’s forests. In fact, greenhouse gas emissions from drained or burned peatlands account for five percent of the global carbon budget. This first report from the Global Peatlands Initiative highlights why the threat to peatlands from agriculture, forestry, resource extraction and infrastructure development is a threat to the climate.


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