Tagged on: Indonesia

Reports and Books
A Suggested National Soils Policy for Indonesia
United Nations Environment Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Soils are a basic natural and almost non-renewable resource, the use of which should be governed by two major principles: - soil losses and degradation must be avoided, and, - soils must be used to their maximum potential for human benefits, but within the limits of environmental soundness and of sustainability. Therefore a national soils policy should constitute a set of guidelines that aim to ensure and promote maximum utilization of soils on a sustained basis, without lowering productivity or causing direct or indirect damage to the environment. A national soils policy has four basic aspects, addressing respectively technical, socio-economic, institutional and legal elements. Indonesia covers almost 2 million km 2 , with a wide range of soils, agroclimates and resultant land-use types. About 30% of the total land surface - 60 million ha - is considered suitable for agricultural production, and half of that is already under cultivation.


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Reports and Books
Smoke on Water: Countering Global Threats from Peatland Loss and Degradation - A Rapid Response Assessment. Revised Edition
United Nations Environment Programme, GRID-Arendal

More than 180 countries have peatlands but we are only just starting to understand their role in both climate change and our efforts to curb it. Peatlands cover less than three percent of the Earth’s surface but are the largest terrestrial organic carbon stock – storing twice as much carbon as in the world’s forests. In fact, greenhouse gas emissions from drained or burned peatlands account for five percent of the global carbon budget. This first report from the Global Peatlands Initiative highlights why the threat to peatlands from agriculture, forestry, resource extraction and infrastructure development is a threat to the climate.


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Reports and Books
Environment and Reconstruction in Aceh: Two Years after the Tsunami
United Nations Environment Programme

This report assesses environmental conditions in Indonesia’s Nanggröe Aceh Darussalam province (Aceh) and Nias, in the province of North Sumatra, two years after the tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean on 26 December 2004. It identifies the key issues and provides recommendations to strengthen reconstruction efforts, help the region achieve sustainable development and reduce risks from future potential disasters.


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Summaries
The Financial System We Need: Aligning the Financial System with Sustainable Development - Policy Summary
United Nations Environment Programme
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Reports and Books
A Framework for Freshwater Ecosystem Management Volume 3: Case Studies
United Nations Environment Programme

This volume illustrates various case studies from around the world, detailing how steps from the Framework for Freshwater Ecosystem Management have been incorporated in freshwater ecosystem initiatives. It is intended to be a ‘living document’ that may be updated with new case studies.


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Reports and Books
Asean Heritage Parks and Reserves
ASEAN Senior Officials on the Environment

the Second ASEAN Ministerial Meeting in Bangkok, on 29 November 1984, issued the important Declaration on Heritage Parks and Reserves which created the first group of 11 Heritage Sites described in this book.


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Reports and Books
Disaster Waste Management Mechanism: A Practical Guide for Construction and Demolition Wastes in Indonesia
United Nations Environment Programme

This publication is a practical guide to assist decision in national and local agencies in Indonesia to understand the issues of disaster wastes management. It outlines the development of local strategies on waste issues, bringing together knowledge and experience on existing and ongoing work on waste and debris clean-up.


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Reports and Books
Financing the Transition: How Financial System Reform Can Serve Sustainable Development
United Nations Environment Programme

This report is focused on understanding how the growing number of policy and regulatory measures taken in the financial system can support a real economy in transition, seeking to answer the question: ‘what measures are most needed to deliver efficiency, effectiveness and resilience in ways that the financial system can contribute to specific sustainability priorities in the real economy?’ To answer this question, we have examined a subset of actions in 10 countries that are focused on the three interlocking challenges
of energy, climate change and land-use.


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Reports and Books
After the Tsunami: Coastal Ecosystem Restoration: Lessons learnt
United Nations Environment Programme

This report explains what is known about coastal ecosystems in the Indonesian province of Nanggröe Aceh Darussalam (NAD or Aceh), their status before the tsunami of 2004, and how they fared after it. It reviews the ecosystem restoration activities that were undertaken in 2005-2006 by a variety of governmental and non-governmental actors, in partnership with many different stakeholder groups, and updates findings into 2007.


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Reports and Books
Monitoring The Restoration of Mangrove Ecosystems from Space
United Nations Environment Programme/GRID-Geneva

Mangrove establishment and rehabilitation projects have had varying levels of success at different locations around the world. Given the money that has been invested in restoring mangrove coverage, it is useful to map, monitor and compare results and experiences in different parts of the globe to compare the success of such projects. This study conducted temporal analyses for 24 mangrove sites from 10 different projects in six different countries (Senegal, the United Arab Emirates, Madagascar, Kenya, Solomon Island and Indonesia) using satellite imagery and GIS technology to map and monitor their status.


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