Tagged on: Indonesia

Reports and Books
Sustainable use of natural resources in the context of trade liberalization and export growth in Indonesia - a study on the use of economic instruments in the pulp and paper industry
United Nations Environment Programme, State Ministry for the Environment, Republic of Indonesia

This study identifies and reviews existing environmental policies in the Indonesian pulp and paper industry. It offers a detailed assessment of existing market-based incentives, and proposes an effluent charge to abate pollution in the pulp and paper industry. The aim of this publication is to promote the use of economic instruments for environmental protection, by providing in-depth analysis, a comprehensive assessment, and a best practice for the utilization of economic instruments for others wishing to introduce economic instruments.


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2005
Reports and Books
After the Tsunami: rapid environmental assessment
United Nations Environment Programme

This report is the product of close cooperation between UNEP and national environmental authorities and experts. It provides a preliminary ground-level look at the tsunami's impact on various sectors of the regions environment. It highlights problems in need of immediate attention, underscoring the strong link between environment and sustainable livelihood and the need for improved early warning and disaster preparedness systems.


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2005
Reports and Books
Asian Environment Outlook 2005: Making Profits, Protecting Our Planet: Corporate Responsibility for Environmental Performance in Asia and the Pacific
Asian Development Bank

This book is the second in the Asian Environment Outlook (AEO) series published by ADB. It centers on the critical missing ingredient in the pursuit of a sustainable future for Asia and the Pacific-that of a fully engaged private sector. AEO 2005 highlights the private sector's role in solving the unprecedented environmental strains facing our region and examines the emerging global pressures-and opportunities-for improved environmental performance. It provides insights and advice on how governments, economic and environmental authorities, and others in the development community can collaborate with the private sector to balance regulatory control with market instruments, help create new business opportunities, and achieve sustainable development.


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2005
Annual Reports
Asian Development Outlook 2004 Update
Asian Development Bank

Developing Asia and the Pacific will grow at 7.0% in 2004, outperforming ADO 2004 forecast of 6.8%. Rebounding exports and buoyant intraregional trade boosted growth, says the ADO 2004 Update. For 2005, as external demand levels off and high oil prices filter through domestic demand, growth forecast is scaled back to 6.2%, from the 6.7% forecast in April. This issue of the Update also assesses different scenarios relating to the short-term impacts of a PRC slowdown and sustained high oil prices on the region.


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2004
Annual Reports
Asian Development Outlook 2004: Foreign Direct Investment in Developing Asia
Asian Development Bank

The annual Asian Development Outlook provides a comprehensive economic analysis of 41 economies in developing Asia and the Pacific. On the basis of the Asian Development Bank's unique knowledge of the region, this 16th edition overviews aggregate trends and medium-term prospects by subregion–East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, Central Asia, and the Pacific–in the context of global economic movements. The region's developing economies generally showed remarkable resilience in 2003. Despite the uncertainties generated by the Iraq conflict, high oil prices, the outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic, and a slow recovery in major industrial countries during the first half of the year, economic growth reached 6.3% in 2003, making it the most dynamic region in the world. Intraregional trade and strong consumer demand will define the outlook for developing Asia in 2004-2005. The stronger outlook for industrial countries over that period will provide a cushion against a possible slowing of surging exports to the People's Republic of China. It will also soften the impact of fiscal consolidation measures that need to be taken in some regional economies. The Asian Development Outlook 2004 includes a chapter on foreign direct investment (FDI) in developing Asia. It argues that, based on a study of a diverse group of developing Asian countries with large or rapidly rising inflows of FDI, the international benefits of FDI are, in fact, highly variable but not necessarily cost-free. The magnitude and productivity of capital flows are dependent on the establishment of an enabling, business-friendly commercial environment, consistent with national development objectives. In this context, a useful paradigm is the \"three i's\"–incentives, institutions, and infrastructure.


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2004
Annual Reports
Asian Development Outlook 2003 Update
Asian Development Bank

The analyses of macroeconomic trends, policy developments, and short-term forecasts for the developing member countries of the Asian Development Bank presented in the Asian Development Outlook 2003 (ADO 2003) published in April 2003 are reviewed in this Update. Despite significant economic shocks linked to the conflict in Iraq, higher oil prices, and the outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic, growth in the Asia and Pacific region continued to be robust during the first three quarters of 2003. This achievement is remarkable as it occurred despite a weaker than expected recovery in the major industrial countries in the first half of 2003. Hence, the projection for aggregate gross domestic product (GDP) growth for 2003 is unchanged compared to that made in ADO 2003, and the GDP forecast for 2004 has now been revised upward.


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2003
Annual Reports
Asian Development Outlook 2002: Preferential Trade Agreements in Asia and the Pacific
Asian Development Bank

This 14th edition of the Asian Development Outlook provides a comprehensive analysis of 41 economies in Asia and the Pacific, based on the Asian Development Bank's in-depth knowledge of the region. For the first time, the Outlook includes a section on Afghanistan. It also provides a broad diagnosis of macroeconomic conditions and growth prospects as they relate to progress in poverty reduction in the economies of the region. Economic growth in developing Asia and the Pacific slowed markedly in 2001 after a strong performance in 1999 and 2000. This is mainly on account of a sharp erosion of external demand as industrial economies experienced recession or very slow growth. There are, however, several exceptions to the general trend with a number of economies, notably the People's Republic of China, maintaining relatively high growth. In some economies, domestic demand, responding to expansionary policy, emerged as a more important source of growth. The outlook for 2002 and 2003 is for renewed optimism. The Outlook includes a special chapter reviewing preferential trade agreements, with particular reference to Asia and the Pacific. As international trade grew rapidly in the 1990s, so did the number of such agreements, especially in the region. The chapter analyzes the impact of such agreements, in the context of the multilateral trade negotiations being carried out under the auspices of the World Trade Organization.


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2002
Annual Reports
Asian Development Outlook 2002 Update
Asian Development Bank

The 2002-2003 economic outlook for developing Asia and the Pacific has not changed significantly since the Asian Development Outlook 2002 was published in April 2002. However, East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Central Asia had a stronger than expected performance in the first half of 2002, while South Asia and the Pacific had weaker than expected performance. The Asian Development Outlook 2002 Update features: an assessment of recent global economic trends and the recent performance and prospects of developing Asia and the Pacific macroeconomic assessments, policy developments and economic outlook for the five subregions of developing Asia and the Pacific


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2002
Annual Reports
Asian Development Outlook 2001: Asia's Globalization Challenge
Asian Development Bank

Notwithstanding the less hospitable external environment, the Asian Development Outlook (ADO) 2001 is cautiously optimistic that the prospects for the Asian and Pacific region remain moderate and will improve by 2002. However, there are significant challenges that the region has to address including taking appropriate policies maintain stable macroeconomy promote prudent financial policies adopt sound regulatory practices There are also significant downside risks in the near-term outlook if the global slowdown persists.


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2001
Annual Reports
Asian Development Outlook 2001 Update
Asian Development Bank

The Asian Development Outlook 2001 Update examines the economic effects of the terror attacks on the United States and its aftermath on developing Asia and the Pacific economies. The 2001 Update: appraises the global economic slowdown, particularly the ICT cyclical downturn in the US that has broadened to other sectors, and describes how it has deepened into a general demand-driven cyclical slowdown, and affected Europe and Japan. carries an extensive analysis of recent economic developments in five Asia and Pacific subregions and 14 developing member countries. highlights the region's macroeconomic fundamentals relative to other regions in the world, which should ride out the global economic slowdown.


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2001