Tagged on: Indonesia

Monograph, Case Study
World heritage and tourism in a changing climate
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), Union of Concerned Scientists

This report provides an overview of the increasing vulnerability of World Heritage sites to climate change impacts and the potential implications for and of global tourism. It also examines the close relationship between World Heritage and tourism, and how climate change is likely to exacerbate problems caused by unplanned tourism development and uncontrolled or poorly managed visitor access, as well as other threats and stresses.


Download: English
2016
Assessment report
Actions on Air Quality: Policies & Programmes for Improving Air quality around the World
United Nations Environment Programme

This publication provides a snapshot of the progress being made to adopt and implement key actions that can significantly improve air quality.


Download: English
2016
Monograph
New Rules for New Horizons: Report of the High Level Symposium on Reshaping Finance for Sustainability
United Nations Environment Programme

Finance is the means by which we channel accumulated wealth into productive new activities to generate more real wealth and wellbeing.


Download: English
2015
Book/Report
The Financial System We Need: Aligning the Financial System with Sustainable Development
United Nations Environment Programme

The global report of the UNEP Inquiry argues that there is now a historic opportunity to shape a financial system that can more effectively finance the development of an inclusive, green economy. This opportunity is based on a growing trend in policy innovation from central banks, financial regulators and standard setters, who are incorporating sustainability factors into the rules that govern the financial system. The report draws together practical examples of policy changes in banking, capital markets, insurance and institutional investment, drawing on detailed work in countries such as Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Colombia, France, India, Indonesia, Kenya, South Africa, the UK and the USA. It offers a Framework for Action that shows how a systematic approach can now be taken at both the national and international levels.


Download: English, Chinese, French, Spanish, Russian, Arabic, Portuguese
2015
Monograph
Towards a Sustainable Financial System in Indonesia
United Nations Environment Programme

Placing Indonesia’s economy onto a green and sustainable development pathway, as envisaged in the National Long Term Development Plan, will require a large mobilization of investment. Estimates of the annual investment needed are in the order of US$300--‐530 billion, with a large portion of this investment needed in critical infrastructure, as well as environmentally sensitive areas such as agriculture, forestry, energy, mining and waste. In addition, financing for SMEs and industry is critical for creating jobs and boosting productivity.


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2015
Monograph
Forest Ecosystem Valuation Study - Indonesia
United Nations Office for REDD Coordination in Indonesia (UNORCID), United Nations Environment Programme

Over the last few years, Indonesia has demonstrated considerable leadership in recognising the value of its natural capital. With the third largest area of tropical forest in the world, Indonesia’s forests play a significant role in climate change mitigation at the national and global level. They are also critical for economic growth and the welfare of people. Therefore, recognising, capturing and demonstrating the benefits provided by forest ecosystems in Indonesia can significantly assist the country in transitioning towards a green economy. This can result in equitable growth, stable economic development and the preservation of Indonesia’s natural assets for its future generations.


Download: English, English, 1__Forest_Ecosystem_Valuation_St_1.pdf, Bahasa
2015
Monograph
The Future of the Bornean Orangutan: impacts of change in land cover and climate

Over the past century, orangutan populations in Southeast Asia have seen a very steep decline, driven to the brink of extinction by a host of man-made threats. Deforestation, illegal logging, the expansion of agro-industrial plantations and hunting – these forces combined to isolate orangutans into precarious pockets of forest on the islands of Borneo and Sumatra. Now, a new threat has emerged: climate change. This report from the Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP) and the Liverpool John Moores University assesses the impacts of land cover change and climate change on Borneo's endangered orangutans. The report also examines the major driver of deforestation – the expansion of oil palm – and analyses how various land-use scenarios might impact the region through different climate change projections. The report concludes, sadly, that a combined model of climate change and landuse change could result in a further three quarter loss of orangutan habitat from the present day.


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2015
Monograph
Environmental dispatches: Reflections on challenges, innovation and resilience in Asia-Pacific
United Nations Environment Programme

This publication “Environmental Dispatches: Reflections on Challenges, Innovation and Resilience in Asia-Pacific” brings together some of these stories. The APFED Showcase Programme offered the chance for journalists in the region to tell those untold stories, spreading knowledge and awareness of how Asia-Pacific communities are addressing sustainable development.


Download: english
2015
Monograph
Statistics of Forestry Production
Government of Indonesia

The future direction of forestry development which supported by the conservation of forest resources can be achieved by placing the function in poverty reduction, economic development and the prevention of environmental damage. To achieve the three objectives of the forestry development and its prerequisites, required data and information that is complete, relevant, accurate, and timely.


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2014
Monograph
Asia Protected Planet Report 2014: Tracking progress towards targets for protected areas in Asia
UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC)

This report assesses progress towards the achievement of elements of Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 in 24 selected countries in East Asia, South Asia and South-east Asia. These are referred to as the “Asia Region” throughout this report and are: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, India, Indonesia, Japan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, the Republic of Korea, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste, and Viet Nam.


Download: English
2014