Tagged on: India

Reports and Books
Marine Litter in the South Asian Seas Region
South Asia Co-operative Environment Programme (SACEP), United Nations Environment Programme

The SAS Region includes the seas bordering Bangladesh, India, Maldives, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka and comprises the Northern part of the Indian Ocean, along with parts of the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea. The countries constituting the SAS Region have almost a fifth of the world‟s total population. High population density, low income, low development indicators, and high dependence upon natural resources for livelihood characterise all these countries.The major sources of coastal and marine pollution originating from land vary among the SAS countries, which show great disparity in size and demography. The nature and intensity of development activities, human population size, income level, and state and type of industry and agriculture are among the factors contributing to each country‟s unique pollution problems


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2007
Annual Reports
Asian Development Bank Sustainability Report 2007: Spotlight on the Environment, Social Development, and Governance
Asian Development Bank

ADB's first Sustainability Report makes easily accessible information on ADB's policies, programs, and practices, as related to promoting the social and environmental sustainability of development in Asia and the Pacific. The report provides background on ADB's mandate and structure, and highlights its activities in the areas of environmental management, social development, and governance||and documents ADB's efforts to minimize its corporate environmental footprint, especially at its Manila headquarters. The content of the report responds to the latest guidelines of the Global Reporting Initiative, while adapting to the particular characteristics of ADB's work and the multiple audiences interested in the information presented.


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2007
Annual Reports
Asian Development Outlook 2007 Update
Asian Development Bank

Developing Asia's prodigious growth continued through the first half of 2007, setting the scene for another bumper year. The region is now expected to expand by 8.3. But this Asian Development Outlook 2007 Update cautions that the prognosis for 2008 is now hazy. Although growth in 2008 is seen slowing gently to 8.2%, the likelihood of a more abrupt deceleration is increasing. Exceptional performance in both the People's Republic of China (PRC) and India is again propelling growth in the region. In the first half of 2007, the PRC grew faster than at any time since 1994 and India, building on its best rate in 18 years in the year to March 2007, registered strong growth in April-June this year. Beyond the gyrations in the global economy, the Update stresses that developing Asia's growth prospects will continue to depend on how well it copes with its own domestic challenges. It is now much better placed to cope with adverse external developments, with its stout financial defenses and some room for policy adjustment. The Update looks at the dynamics of export performance in East Asia. It suggests that supply-side factors-including the quality of infrastructure and the business investment climate-play an important role export performance and that external demand remains an important driver of trade in parts and components. The role of the real exchange rate has changed overtime, as composition of exports has changed.


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2007
Reports and Books
Regional Consultations on Climate Change Adaptation Opportunities and the Way Forward
South Asia Co-operative Environment Programme (SACEP), Centre for Environment Education - India

The technical report prepared post – January meeting organized by SACEP and CEE clearly highlights the need for sector – specific technical assistance teams which can help generate empirical evidences on the degree of susceptibility and locally relevant measures to tackle them. SACEP is also moving in this direction inspired by reference to the TEAP and the TOCs of the Montreal Protocol and recent discussions within the GEF too to form such support groups. The TOR for such a technical group will be to compile state of art information on management strategies and present a menu of options which will be the basis for developing implementation projects. SACEP and CEE will then approach the respective country governments, bilateral and multilateral agencies therein for support for implementation.


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2007
Reports and Books
Technical report - Improving preparedness of the region To assess and devise appropriate interventions To address challenges in 'adaptation to climate change'
South Asia Co-operative Environment Programme (SACEP), Centre for Environment Education (CEE)- India

South Asia Co-operative Environment Programme (SACEP) attempts to fulfill its mandate ofproviding and enabling technical assistance at the regional level to address environmental challenges with a bearing on the developmental agenda of the countries in South Asia. SACEP recognizes the enormous significance of adaptation to climate change in this context. This is in response to a felt need to synergize expertise and efforts through mutually reinforcing interventions centered on a participatory process as articulated by its Governing Council. SACEP's collaboration with Centre for Environment Education (CEE) -India signified such a synergy, aimed at a reality check of the needs and the development ofa menu of responses.


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2007
Manuals and Guides
Women, energy and water in the Himalayas: integration of women in planning and management
United Nations Environment Programme

The policy guidelines were developed as part of the pilot project 'Incorporating Needs and Roles of Women in Water and Energy Management in Rural Areas in South Asia-Capacity Building in Rural Areas of the Himalayas'. Women were provided with hands on training on the management of energy and water using the training manual developed by the project. The experiences gained were used to develop the policy guidelines for involving women in water and energy activities at the local level.


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2005
Reports and Books
Asian Environment Outlook 2005: Making Profits, Protecting Our Planet: Corporate Responsibility for Environmental Performance in Asia and the Pacific
Asian Development Bank

This book is the second in the Asian Environment Outlook (AEO) series published by ADB. It centers on the critical missing ingredient in the pursuit of a sustainable future for Asia and the Pacific-that of a fully engaged private sector. AEO 2005 highlights the private sector's role in solving the unprecedented environmental strains facing our region and examines the emerging global pressures-and opportunities-for improved environmental performance. It provides insights and advice on how governments, economic and environmental authorities, and others in the development community can collaborate with the private sector to balance regulatory control with market instruments, help create new business opportunities, and achieve sustainable development.


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2005
Reports and Books
Women, energy and water in the Himalayas: training of trainers manual
United Nations Environment Programme

This Manual provides learning tools for carrying out gender analysis, mobilising communities, identifying prioritised needs and solutions, and designing and using gender sensitive participatory action planning in water and energy and other related fields. It draws from a recent project on Incorporating the Needs and Roles of Women in Water and Energy Management in Rural Areas in South Asia.


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2005
Annual Reports
Asian Development Outlook 2004 Update
Asian Development Bank

Developing Asia and the Pacific will grow at 7.0% in 2004, outperforming ADO 2004 forecast of 6.8%. Rebounding exports and buoyant intraregional trade boosted growth, says the ADO 2004 Update. For 2005, as external demand levels off and high oil prices filter through domestic demand, growth forecast is scaled back to 6.2%, from the 6.7% forecast in April. This issue of the Update also assesses different scenarios relating to the short-term impacts of a PRC slowdown and sustained high oil prices on the region.


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2004
Annual Reports
Asian Development Outlook 2004: Foreign Direct Investment in Developing Asia
Asian Development Bank

The annual Asian Development Outlook provides a comprehensive economic analysis of 41 economies in developing Asia and the Pacific. On the basis of the Asian Development Bank's unique knowledge of the region, this 16th edition overviews aggregate trends and medium-term prospects by subregion–East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, Central Asia, and the Pacific–in the context of global economic movements. The region's developing economies generally showed remarkable resilience in 2003. Despite the uncertainties generated by the Iraq conflict, high oil prices, the outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic, and a slow recovery in major industrial countries during the first half of the year, economic growth reached 6.3% in 2003, making it the most dynamic region in the world. Intraregional trade and strong consumer demand will define the outlook for developing Asia in 2004-2005. The stronger outlook for industrial countries over that period will provide a cushion against a possible slowing of surging exports to the People's Republic of China. It will also soften the impact of fiscal consolidation measures that need to be taken in some regional economies. The Asian Development Outlook 2004 includes a chapter on foreign direct investment (FDI) in developing Asia. It argues that, based on a study of a diverse group of developing Asian countries with large or rapidly rising inflows of FDI, the international benefits of FDI are, in fact, highly variable but not necessarily cost-free. The magnitude and productivity of capital flows are dependent on the establishment of an enabling, business-friendly commercial environment, consistent with national development objectives. In this context, a useful paradigm is the \"three i's\"–incentives, institutions, and infrastructure.


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2004