Tagged on: Global

Reports and Books
Certification and Sustainable Fisheries
United Nations Environment Programme

The main concern of this paper is a consideration of the hypothetical and actual benefits of certification and eco-labelling. The paper focuses on environmental certification of capture fisheries (rather than social and/or aquaculture certification), and has a strong focus on developing countries.


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Reports and Books
Sustainability Criteria for Fisheries Subsidies: Options for the WTO and Beyond
United Nations Environment Programme

The aim of this paper is to assist governments in the identification of criteria for the use of fisheries subsidies, with the dual ambition of helping WTO negotiators craft new international law and providing domestic governments with useful advice as they pursue responsible fisheries subsidies policies. These two ambitions obviously overlap, but are also somewhat distinct. WTO rules cannot embody robust policy advice for fisheries managers, but can only set a few simplified (but important) legal constraints on the “policy space” governments enjoy for fisheries subsidies.


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Reports and Books
Towards Sustainable Fisheries Access Agreements: Issues and Options at the World Trade Organization
United Nations Environment Programme

This paper presents concrete textual suggestions for improving the ASCM with regards to “access-related” fisheries subsidies. Suggested options range from improving the definition of subsidies to introducing criteria-conditioned exceptions for developing countries and strengthening transparency requirements of access agreements. With regard to ongoing WTO negotiations, the paper argues that a clarification on “access-related” subsidies within reformed fisheries subsidies disciplines would establish a solid basis for dealing with a key element of international fisheries policy and avoid potential litigation at a later stage. It would also provide the opportunity to establish conditions to ensure that access agreements enhance and not undermine the sustainable development of small island and coastal developing countries.


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Reports and Books
Green Industrial Policy: Concept, Policies, Country Experiences
United Nations Environment Programme

“Green industrial policy: Concept, policies, country Experiences” is a joint publication by UN Environment and the German Development Institute/ Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE). It illustrates how green industrial policy can be a driver for a green economy transformation and highlights the social, environmental and economic co-benefits of green industrial policy. Economic development in the age of industrialization has been achieved at the cost of severe overexploitation of natural resources. Humanity is approaching various ecological tipping points beyond which abrupt and irreversible environmental change at large geographical scale is likely to happen. reen industrial policy instruments can support the transition to economic structures that balance environmental sustainability and wealth creation and help catalyse the needed change towards a sustainable future. The report provides valuable insights and background knowledge for policy-makers and academia and paints a detailed picture of the state of research into green industrial policy. With case studies from China, Morocco, Brazil and Germany, the report illustrates efforts for structural change around the world. A special focus is given to developing countries, because of their need for growth and their high potential for transformation, as they are not yet locked into unsustainable pathways.


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Reports and Books
Progress on Ambient Water Quality: Piloting the Monitoring Methodology and Initial Findings for SDG indicator 6.3.2
United Nations Environment Programme

This report highlights the importance of good ambient water quality and the interlinkages between indicator 6.3.2 and other SDG 6 indicators, as well as the importance of target 6.3 in achieving many of the other SDGs. The report summarizes the progress made to date on indicator 6.3.2, focusing on the 2017 global data drive, and reflects on the process and the lessons learned from feedback and engagement. It also presents an analysis of the submissions received, focusing on the global disparities in water-quality monitoring capacity and the various reporting challenges that Member States face, and suggests how this information can be used to shape the
development of the methodology. And lastly, it highlights the level of support that certain countries need to report the indicator.
1.3. Target 6.3


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Reports and Books
Progress on Integrated Water Resources Management: Global Baseline for SDG 6 Indicator 6.5.1 - Degree of IWRM Implementation
United Nations Environment Programme

To achieve SDG 6 we need to monitor and report progress. Information on progress is also essential to ensure accountability and generate political, public and private sector support for investment. The UN-Water Integrated Monitoring Initiative for SDG 6 is an essential element of the United Nations’ determination to ensure the availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all by 2030. This report illustrates examples from countries highlighting key challenges, and importantly examples of success that are highly relevant for other countries in the world. It also aims to support countries and stakeholders in prioritizing action to advance sustainable water management in each country.


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