Tagged on: China

Annual Reports
Asian Development Outlook 2007 Update
Asian Development Bank

Developing Asia's prodigious growth continued through the first half of 2007, setting the scene for another bumper year. The region is now expected to expand by 8.3. But this Asian Development Outlook 2007 Update cautions that the prognosis for 2008 is now hazy. Although growth in 2008 is seen slowing gently to 8.2%, the likelihood of a more abrupt deceleration is increasing. Exceptional performance in both the People's Republic of China (PRC) and India is again propelling growth in the region. In the first half of 2007, the PRC grew faster than at any time since 1994 and India, building on its best rate in 18 years in the year to March 2007, registered strong growth in April-June this year. Beyond the gyrations in the global economy, the Update stresses that developing Asia's growth prospects will continue to depend on how well it copes with its own domestic challenges. It is now much better placed to cope with adverse external developments, with its stout financial defenses and some room for policy adjustment. The Update looks at the dynamics of export performance in East Asia. It suggests that supply-side factors-including the quality of infrastructure and the business investment climate-play an important role export performance and that external demand remains an important driver of trade in parts and components. The role of the real exchange rate has changed overtime, as composition of exports has changed.


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2007
Annual Reports
Asian Development Bank Sustainability Report 2007: Spotlight on the Environment, Social Development, and Governance
Asian Development Bank

ADB's first Sustainability Report makes easily accessible information on ADB's policies, programs, and practices, as related to promoting the social and environmental sustainability of development in Asia and the Pacific. The report provides background on ADB's mandate and structure, and highlights its activities in the areas of environmental management, social development, and governance||and documents ADB's efforts to minimize its corporate environmental footprint, especially at its Manila headquarters. The content of the report responds to the latest guidelines of the Global Reporting Initiative, while adapting to the particular characteristics of ADB's work and the multiple audiences interested in the information presented.


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2007
Report of 5th NOWPAP DINRAC Focal Points Meeting
Data and Information Network Regional Activity Centre (DINRAC), United Nations Environment Programme
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2006
Reports and Books
Global International Waters Assessment: South China Sea, GIWA Regional Assessment 54
United Nations Environment Programme, GEF, University of Kalmar, Sweden

This report presents the GIWA assessment of the South China Sea region, which lies in the global centre of tropical marine biodiversity and comprises nine nations: China, Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Brunei and the Philippines. The region supports a rapidly growing coastal population, and has rapidly deteriorating marine ecosystems with the likely immediate collapse of many of its coral reefs and pelagic fish populations. Habitat modification and overexploitation of living resources were found to cause the most severe transboundary environmental and socio-economic impacts in the region. The past and present status and future prospects of these issues are discussed, and they are traced back to their root causes. Policy options to mitigate these problems are proposed that aim to provide solutions to these fundamental issues, in order to enhance the management of the region's aquatic environment.


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2005
Reports and Books
Global International Waters Assessment: Yellow Sea, GIWA Regional Assessment 34
United Nations Environment Programme, GEF, University of Kalmar, Sweden

This report presents the results of the GIWA assessment of the Yellow Sea region and the adjacent Bohai Sea sub-system. The Yellow sea is a semi-enclosed water body bordering the Chinese mainland to the west and the Korean Peninsula to the east. Results from the assessment of the Bohai sub-system, which is entirely located within China and therefore not considered transboundary, is also presented. Freshwater shortage, habitat and community modification and unsustainable exploitation of fish and other living resources were assessed to be the priority concerns in both sub-systems. The past and present status and future prospects are discussed, and the transboundary issues are traced back to their root causes. Increased population growth and mass migration to urban areas is a major root cause in this region. Policy options have been recommended to mitigate environmental and socio-economic impacts and to secure the region's future prosperity.


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2005
Reports and Books
Integrated assessment of the impact of trade liberalization: a country study on the rice sector in China
United Nations Environment Programme, State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA), Centre for Chinese Agricultural Policy (CCAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), School of Environment, Beijing Normal University (BNU).

This country study focuses on the environmental, economic and social effects of trade liberalization on the rice sector in China. It demonstrates that the WTO Agreements on Agriculture did not have much impact, but that the regional agreements are more likely to have one. This study also demonstrates that in many instances, other factors of liberalization, including changes in the exchange rate and measures of internal market liberalization, have had a more profound impact than the multilateral trading system. Research institutions in this country, which are familiar with the local economy, the environmental challenges and the policy priorities, conducted this assessment.


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2005
Reports and Books
Asian Environment Outlook 2005: Making Profits, Protecting Our Planet: Corporate Responsibility for Environmental Performance in Asia and the Pacific
Asian Development Bank

This book is the second in the Asian Environment Outlook (AEO) series published by ADB. It centers on the critical missing ingredient in the pursuit of a sustainable future for Asia and the Pacific-that of a fully engaged private sector. AEO 2005 highlights the private sector's role in solving the unprecedented environmental strains facing our region and examines the emerging global pressures-and opportunities-for improved environmental performance. It provides insights and advice on how governments, economic and environmental authorities, and others in the development community can collaborate with the private sector to balance regulatory control with market instruments, help create new business opportunities, and achieve sustainable development.


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2005
Report of 4th NOWPAP DINRAC Focal Points Meeting
Data and Information Network Regional Activity Centre (DINRAC), United Nations Environment Programme
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2005
Reports and Books
Global International Waters Assessment: East China Sea, GIWA Regional Assessment 36
United Nations Environment Programme, GEF, University of Kalmar, Sweden

This report presents results of the GIWA assessment of the East China Sea region, which is one of the largest marginal seas in the world. This region receives tremendous inflow of freshwater and terrestrial sediments, predominantly from China's mainland. The region is characterized by a large population and rapid economic development. The natural landscape in the region's drainage basins has been greatly modified by the development and expansion of agriculture, the construction of dams as well as urbanization. Aquaculture and coastal area reclamation alter natural wetlands and destroy spawning and nursery grounds in the East China Sea. Overexploitation of fish, eutrophication and habitat modification are of particular concern in the region. The past and present status and future prospects are discussed, and the transboundary issues are traced back to their root causes. Policy options that aim to address these driving issues in order to significantly improve environmental quality and secure the region's future prosperity are recommended


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2005
Annual Reports
Asian Development Outlook 2004 Update
Asian Development Bank

Developing Asia and the Pacific will grow at 7.0% in 2004, outperforming ADO 2004 forecast of 6.8%. Rebounding exports and buoyant intraregional trade boosted growth, says the ADO 2004 Update. For 2005, as external demand levels off and high oil prices filter through domestic demand, growth forecast is scaled back to 6.2%, from the 6.7% forecast in April. This issue of the Update also assesses different scenarios relating to the short-term impacts of a PRC slowdown and sustained high oil prices on the region.


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2004